Outdoors News Stories

JulieKT

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Joined
Sep 7, 2014
Messages
129
The argument that they've been there longer therefore they know better how to treat it right is a complete joke, IMO. It's their livelihood, so yes, they know how to run cows on it and stay profitable. That does not even come close to equating to overall land management with all users and the ecosystem's general health in mind.
Agreed. Such an insanely touchy subject...people can get very blinkered when they discuss land management and grazing in sensitive areas. Bovines are not exactly native to GSENM, but damn does the conversational fire explode whenever you try to point that out to anyone close to these grazing situations.

I'm a big fan of science knowing what's best. I'd like to assume a land manager with an education on managing that land is taking more into account than just the quickest, cheapest, easiest way to feed a cow.
I really think you're right on this in most cases. And...pressure, political and local community-driven, can be enormous on land managers in certain areas. Garfield County is well-known for having an extremely conservative and vocal town council. Luckily, also living in that county are some people with very vested interests in the land being conserved *not* just for ranchers, which I believe ensures there will never be certain land losses (i.e. unrestricted grazing, fracking, etc.) without at least huge battles being waged first.

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I really thought the landscape in Kodachrome State Park was greatly improved by the addition of cattle. Just think if we let Utah take control we could have cattle around all our favorite locations.
Worst nightmare to see the state take control. That picture is just...yuck.

Okay, all of that was just my own opinion piece. :) Here's an article I don't think I saw linked in this thread, though. It's about bison vs. jackrabbits affecting grazing in the Henrys, and a little anecdotal evidence that some minds are certainly open to science rather than just that's-how-we've-always-done-it. Published this past January.
http://www.sltrib.com/news/2080640-155/usu-study-jackrabbits-are-a-bigger
 

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Devo

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Joined
Mar 1, 2014
Messages
152
http://www.ktvb.com/story/news/crim...ally-significant-area-east-of-boise/26956103/

ADA COUNTY - There's a good chance that whoever spray-painted a prom proposal on the Black Cliffs east of Boise isn't going to have any money for a tux, limo or anything else, the Ada County Sheriff's Office says.

The sheriff's office is investigating after a message was discovered spray-painted in large letters on the side of the Black Cliffs in East Car Body Canyon, a popular rock climbing spot along Idaho 21 west of Lucky Peak Reservoir.

Climbers said they first noticed the promposal Saturday afternoon.

"It's just really sad that someone would come out here and paint the cliffs like that," said Jarod Murray, local rock climber.

Cleanup will likely be costly, the sheriff's office said, because it's a long hike to the top and requires climbing over boulders.

The Black Cliffs area is owned by the Bureau of Land Management and is a culturally significant area for Native American Tribes, the sheriff's office said.

The BLM is aware of the damage, but no cleanup decisions have been made.

Spray-painting the side of the cliff is a misdemeanor charge of injury by graffiti. That's punishable by up to a $1,000 fine and up to six months in jail.


An additional misdemeanor federal charge - willfully defacing … any scientific, cultural, archeological, or historic resource, natural object or area - is possible, the sheriff's office said.

:facepalm: Wonder if she has said yes yet.... She may reconsider after this story makes it's rounds.
 

slc_dan

Desert Rat-Weekend Warrior
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Jun 7, 2012
Messages
1,685
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I really thought the landscape in Kodachrome State Park was greatly improved by the addition of cattle. Just think if we let Utah take control we could have cattle around all our favorite locations.

I remember driving up to that big monolith. Cows had overeaten everything in sight, cow shit everywhere. That park is EXACTLY what Utah just doesn't get about parks. Overdeveloped, over signed, and under-protected.
 

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Dan_85

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Joined
Jul 25, 2013
Messages
226
http://www.slate.com/articles/healt...tion_protecting_ranchers_by_ignoring_the.html

Imagine visiting Yellowstone this summer. You wake up before dawn to take a picture of the sunrise over the mists emanating from Yellowstone hot springs. A thunderhead towers above the rising sun, and the picture turns out beautifully. You submit the photo to a contest sponsored by the National Weather Service. Under a statute signed into law by the Wyoming governor this spring, you have just committed a crime and could face up to one year in prison.
Thoughts on this?
 

DrNed

The mountains are calling and I must go
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Mar 31, 2013
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1,012

Perry

Formerly Cuberant
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Joined
Aug 8, 2016
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Wow! Amazing he was still alive


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

IntrepidXJ

ADVENTR
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Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
3,250
I suppose it was inevitable, but if all I've seen some of my social media feeds over the weekend is true, the trail for accessing False Kiva has now been closed as a result of vandalism...Makes me wonder how many more sites like this will see the same fate as time goes on...

https://fstoppers.com/landscapes/vandalism-false-kiva-canyonlands-closes-access-277714

The trail is still open, you just can't enter the alcove any longer. The same thing happened to the ruin on Aztec Butte a while back.
 

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