What's in your emergency medical kit, if anything?

Bob

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I don't know, maybe I have been a risk taker, I've brought very little on my trips in the Adirondacks...and now that I want to venture out further and longer in wilder places, and getting older, I should be learning about the minimum first aid kit I should be bringing.
What I carry also depends on the trip..... Trail walking? Or above timberline boulder hoping
 

Bob

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@Wyatt Carson Just as an emergency backup. We had a local resident stung on the drive home a few years back. That his wife knew, he had never reacted before but died on the drive. This and a few other similar cases have prompted me to want some. I just read that I can buy it at a reasonable price in Canada, so when the border re-opens, I'll head over there, if my doc won't prescribe it here.

I'll just have to remain calm when re-entering the US. :)
Your reaction can change....
 

TheMountainRabbit

"Because it's there."
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My personal kit is pretty minimalist - mostly focused on items to keep me on the trail. If it's bad enough that I need to bail (or worse - hit my beacon), either: a) I just need to get out anyway; or b) I can start re-purposing/destroying gear to match the scenario.

I'll echo others that say not to bring anything you don't know how to use - I see that semi-frequently w/ pre-packaged kits.

I don't generally give specific advice on FAKs though, because I'm no expert and you might need that item I don't generally bring - I've just decided the likelihood isn't high enough for me to include it.
 

Outdoor_Fool

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I don't know, maybe I have been a risk taker, I've brought very little on my trips in the Adirondacks...and now that I want to venture out further and longer in wilder places, and getting older, I should be learning about the minimum first aid kit I should be bringing.
Without adequate training, the kit is next-to-useless, so be sure to take a course or 2, if you haven't already.
 

wsp_scott

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May 16, 2016
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Very minimal FAK with Advil, bandaids, leukotape, benadryl, nyquil for first aid, I've used the first couple on lots of different trips, but never the benadryl or nyquil

I also have a couple water treatment tabs in case my filter breaks and a tiny screwdriver from an eyeglass repair kit since I had a pair of glasses where the screws kept loosening over time.
 

Janice

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Dec 5, 2017
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In addition to what others have said - alcohol wipes, tweezers.

Similar to what some have said - lots of Advil and Tylenol (knees and Achilles complain to me if I don't use enough - I alternate and dose before it gets bad).

I pre-tape sensitive spots on my feet, so I always bring the tape I like. My husband loves Leukotape for the same purpose. We also make sure we have plenty of duct tape wound around our Nalgenes in case we need it - occasionally for first aid, to repair torn gear, etc.
 

Laura V.

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Most items commonly found in a first aid kit can be improvised from gear, sticks, etc., so I usually carry a pretty minimal kit. I carry a few bandages, some moleskin, a syringe for flushing wounds (and back flushing my filter), Ibuprofin, Benadryl, and 2 epi pens. (I’m asthmatic with a history of severe allergic reactions). That said, I change out my kit depending on where I’m going, when, and with whom. When my young nieces come along, I bring an entire pharmacy.
 

balzaccom

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You all who carry epi pens, do you have a known allergic action or are you simply erring on the side of caution?
i had a severe reaction to a bee sting a few years ago. Stung on my thigh, and my leg swelled up to twice its normal size. Went to the Dr, who treated that, then gave me a whole bunch of tests to determine that I was allergic to honey bees...and not much else. Over the intervening years I have been given innumerable de-sensitivity injections which seem to be working---I now get almost no reaction to them, but the Doc still says I need to carry an epipen because of my previous history. The warnings they gave me about anaphylactic shock(Go straight to the emergency room.. Do not register or talk to reception, grab the first medical person you see and tell them that you are experiencing anaphylactic shock) made an impression.

I have to admit I am a little distressed by those who are getting epipens by falsely claiming a need. There is a shortage of these in the USA, and for the people who need them, they are a matter of life a death. To claim a couple because you might go backpacking? Sorry, I think that's unconscionable.
 

Wyatt Carson

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i had a severe reaction to a bee sting a few years ago. Stung on my thigh, and my leg swelled up to twice its normal size. Went to the Dr, who treated that, then gave me a whole bunch of tests to determine that I was allergic to honey bees...and not much else. Over the intervening years I have been given innumerable de-sensitivity injections which seem to be working---I now get almost no reaction to them, but the Doc still says I need to carry an epipen because of my previous history. The warnings they gave me about anaphylactic shock(Go straight to the emergency room.. Do not register or talk to reception, grab the first medical person you see and tell them that you are experiencing anaphylactic shock) made an impression.

I have to admit I am a little distressed by those who are getting epipens by falsely claiming a need. There is a shortage of these in the USA, and for the people who need them, they are a matter of life a death. To claim a couple because you might go backpacking? Sorry, I think that's unconscionable.


Thanks, there are definitely some who need these. I wonder what percentage have this need. Last year an errant bee flew into my neck and stung me in the backyard but other than mild swelling it was okay. I’ve been stung a bunch but that may or may not help with future incidences I gather.

We do see a lot of amazing swarms when out in the wilderness. Zillions fly right overhead. It can be a bit unnerving but they never pay attention to us. You know what a pot sounds like when it is just on the brink of coming to a boil? After several swarms a couple years ago girlfriend literally freaked out when our pot did that, sounds like an approaching swarm.

We have also had a swarm stop in our backyard mesquite and form a huge cluster in the shape of a beard. Probably 4000 to 6000 bees were in that formation. I walked out and photographed them. Lol Ours are Africanized.

Well, be safe out there. We do use certain spices and herbs for anti inflammatorys. Cloves and turmeric are a couple. I know they work. Girlfriend has her list and combinations she brings along.
 
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Where are bees a real risk? Backpacking in the Adirondacks I've never gone prepared for bee stings and I never encountered and bees! Which regions is this a big enough risk to prepare for the possibility?
 

Rockskipper

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There have been a couple of serious attacks of Africanized bees near Mesquite and St. George. Other than that, haven't heard of any in the Intermountain West here. But then there's the army ants coming up from Costa Rica...saw a pack of them carrying away a moose up in the Winds one time. People have taken to spreading honey around their tents to keep them away.
 

Rockskipper

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Well, I've heard it's also good as a bear deterrant, as they're too busy lapping up the honey to care about who's in the tent. I think a few outfitters are even thinking about providing it as a service, as I overheard a couple of guys in Pinedale talking about honey buckets.
 

Kmatjhwy

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Sep 23, 2016
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Not much in my medicine kit. Haven't ever really used it much. When I have needed something, just have extensively used the wild medicinal plants. For instance some years ago, came down with giardia when in the back wilds. I extensively ate a huge amount of Yarrow, which is good for the digestive system. In like a day or two, I was back to normal.
 

marmot_boi

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Not much in my medicine kit. Haven't ever really used it much. When I have needed something, just have extensively used the wild medicinal plants. For instance some years ago, came down with giardia when in the back wilds. I extensively ate a huge amount of Yarrow, which is good for the digestive system. In like a day or two, I was bike to normal.
That's good to know. How was the taste?
 

Kmatjhwy

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Sep 23, 2016
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Now I love Yarrow. Some people will say it tastes a little bitter. When hiking I try to eat several Yarrow leaves daily which seem to always do me good. Yarrow has many uses, one it is good internally on the digestive system.Also it can be made into a poultice and put on wounds. It is known that it will help the wound heal up faster. The Roman Army carried packs of Yarrow for this purpose. Many good edible and medicinal plants out there.

And here in the West is Biscuit Root, Lomatium Species. In this day of Covid ... It is good against Respiratory sicknesses. It is found all over here in the Greater Yellowstone area. The bears also love it!

Just a few for everyone.
 

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