What did you NOT buy today?

Jackson

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May 31, 2015
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Ok I need to do this. Have just been sort of worried I'll make things worse instead of better. Thanks!
And as a precaution, I've heard that washing machines with agitators can be rough on baffled nylon, so if your washer has an agitator, washing by hand in the bathtub is the move. I did that a few years ago. Bought a front loader last year partially because I wanted to be able to wash my down stuff in a washing machine. Haha.
 

Ugly

Life really is better Here
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Apr 20, 2013
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And as a precaution, I've heard that washing machines with agitators can be rough on baffled nylon, so if your washer has an agitator, washing by hand in the bathtub is the move. I did that a few years ago. Bought a front loader last year partially because I wanted to be able to wash my down stuff in a washing machine. Haha.

We have a top load without a center agitator, but I have not used it yet for a sleeping bag, just a puffy.

I recommend the tub for 2 reasons- to be sure to properly soak/submerge the bag can take a bit of doing. Some parts fight getting wet. You could get similar results perhaps by stopping the wash cycle in a machine when it is first soaking and let it soak for a while.
Second, the bag is SO heavy, I always worry about the stitching and stress on the fabric as it tosses around. Might be overkill, but even before drying I gently squeeze out a bunch of water and prop up the sleeping bag on something like a bucket to let it drain a while before putting it in a basket to carry it to the dryer.

Oh, I guess there are 3. When you use the tub, and your sleeping bag is really dirty, you can rinse and drain and rinse as many times as you need until the water runs clear, so you can control the results a bit.

It is tedious, but it does help a lot with loft and funkiness.
I have used Nik products only... and you can decide on whether to just do a tech wash or to also do the down-proof as an extra step.
 

LarryBoy

Hiker Trash
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Jan 4, 2015
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When I started the Appalachian Trail in 2013, i had a big Osprey Aether pack, a 650-fill LL Bean sleeping bag, and a bivy/tent thing that I bought at Cabelas for 30 bucks. My packweight wasn't really too much of an outlier on the AT (mostly because most folks who begin the AT have very little backpacking experience). I don't really know what my baseweight was, but it was probably somewhere between 20-30 lbs.

When I got done with the AT, my joints informed me that in order to continue backpacking, I needed to make some radical changes. I went full Ultralight Zealot for a bit there, and when I returned to the AT the next summer to fill in some sections that I missed, my packweight had been cut by at least 60% and I was so much the happier for it.

I would never dream of doing another long trail with the not-very-suitable gear I used in 2013. By contrast, I still use basically the same stuff that I had in 2014. I've had to replace items here and there, as months and miles have taken their toll, but I'm still carrying essentially the same set-up a decade later. I definitely don't use the fanciest stuff, but it's quality, built to last, and light enough that it works for me. My load-hauler pack, the ULA Circuit, should get a special mention. I've got probably 10,000 miles on it, many of those off-trail/bushwhacky/sliding on sandstone, and it's held up just fine. I had ULA replace a couple components on it a few years ago, and the pack has kept soldiering along. It's getting toward the end of its life, but I bet it still has another couple thru-hikes on it before it finally gives up the ghost.

I think that for many people (particularly those with comparatively more money than time), gear collection in itself becomes a hobby. But paradoxically, I've found that the more people actually use their gear, the less they obsess over it.
 

LarryBoy

Hiker Trash
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I only buy new stuff if my old stuff breaks. My old columbia backpack started developing holes after 15+ years so I got the stratus 34 to replace it. I still wear the same columbia windbreaker I've had for 12+ years. Even after my 40 foot fall last October, it had nary a scratch. Can't beat that!
If anything, that's a good reason not to get rid of it! During my bear attack, my boonie hat got ripped up. It was getting kind of old and decripit anyway, but after the bear attack, you bet your bippy i'm not getting rid of it. Stitched it up and have continued to wear it. I call it my "Gratitude Hat".
 

fossana

Member
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Jan 11, 2018
Messages
668
I spend ~12 months troubleshooting an idle issue on my 10+ year old Honda Element to avoid having to get another car. What finally fixed it was readjusting the valves; it took me 2 tries. I had taken it to a shop earlier for this (and back again to redo it when it immediately threw a check engine light), but they weren't to spec and those engines are finicky about the sweet spot clearance.
 
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Jackson

I ❤️ GYE
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I spend ~12 months troubleshooting an idle issue on my 10+ year old Honda Element to avoid having to get another car. What finally fixed it was readjusting the valves; it took me 2 tries. I had taken it to a shop earlier for this (and back again to redo it when it immediately threw a check engine light), but they weren't to spec and those engines are finicky about the sweet spot clearance.
I did my own valve adjustment on my previous car a few years ago. It made me feel like a car genius because it's the most involved maintenance I've ever done myself. Haha.

I've heard the Honda Element is a gem of a vehicle. I was surprised the first time I heard that because my opinion was entirely based on their appearance.
 

Yvonne

I lava it!!!
Joined
Jan 19, 2012
Messages
3,970
I still use some of my original backpacking gear which is more than 12 years old. It's still good so I do not see a need to replace it.
I try to use my gear as long as possible but it never works with hiking shoes. They only last me a few months then the rubber sole is toast and gone. I wish there were shoes out there where you could just replace the sole
 

fossana

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Jan 11, 2018
Messages
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I did my own valve adjustment on my previous car a few years ago. It made me feel like a car genius because it's the most involved maintenance I've ever done myself. Haha.

I've heard the Honda Element is a gem of a vehicle. I was surprised the first time I heard that because my opinion was entirely based on their appearance.
I stupidly took it into the shop for the original adjustment, thinking it was going to be a huge pain in the butt and considering my long backlog of house projects. It really wasn't too bad. In my poor college student days, I did more involved engine tweaks (e.g. rod bearing replacement) under the guidance of the car performance-obsessed students I interned with at a biotech company.

The Element gets crappy gas mileage, but it's easy to reconfigure the rear seats/cargo space, giving a lot of vertical space, and there's no carpet. I can fit my MTB in the back upright w/o removing the front wheel.
 

WasatchWill

Ready For More
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Joined
Jul 23, 2013
Messages
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When I started the Appalachian Trail in 2013, i had a big Osprey Aether pack, a 650-fill LL Bean sleeping bag, and a bivy/tent thing that I bought at Cabelas for 30 bucks. My packweight wasn't really too much of an outlier on the AT (mostly because most folks who begin the AT have very little backpacking experience). I don't really know what my baseweight was, but it was probably somewhere between 20-30 lbs.

When I got done with the AT, my joints informed me that in order to continue backpacking, I needed to make some radical changes. I went full Ultralight Zealot for a bit there, and when I returned to the AT the next summer to fill in some sections that I missed, my packweight had been cut by at least 60% and I was so much the happier for it.

I would never dream of doing another long trail with the not-very-suitable gear I used in 2013. By contrast, I still use basically the same stuff that I had in 2014. I've had to replace items here and there, as months and miles have taken their toll, but I'm still carrying essentially the same set-up a decade later. I definitely don't use the fanciest stuff, but it's quality, built to last, and light enough that it works for me. My load-hauler pack, the ULA Circuit, should get a special mention. I've got probably 10,000 miles on it, many of those off-trail/bushwhacky/sliding on sandstone, and it's held up just fine. I had ULA replace a couple components on it a few years ago, and the pack has kept soldiering along. It's getting toward the end of its life, but I bet it still has another couple thru-hikes on it before it finally gives up the ghost.

I think that for many people (particularly those with comparatively more money than time), gear collection in itself becomes a hobby. But paradoxically, I've found that the more people actually use their gear, the less they obsess over it.

This makes me so happy as proud owner of a Circuit myself. I have a friend who is second in command at Waymark now though so it might be hard not to add one of those into my pack rotation at some point.

I am guilty of having bought a lot of gear myself over the years in trying to figure out what I like most and trying to find that happy balance between cost and quality. I've probably spent more now as a result of that than had I splurged on better quality stuff earlier on. But I'm also now at a point where I can feel much more content with what i've got now that I have some quality stuff that is lightweight and packs easy. I've held on to much of my original stuff though for my kids to grow into as they become teenagers and to loan to any other friends or family whenever I can persuade them into coming along with me for some select trips.
 
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Rockskipper

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balzaccom

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But paradoxically, I've found that the more people actually use their gear, the less they obsess over it.
I've noticed that too. It seems like the only reason some people go hiking is to test their new gear....the rest of the time, they're at home thinking about what other gear they need.
 

eyesup

New Member
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Jan 29, 2022
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Wow. A thread just for me.

Yesterday I returned ~$1400 worth of shiny new gear. Think Leki, Arc'Teryx, Gregory, Therm-a-rest etc. All stuff I'd bought a week prior in order to allow my wife to substitute for another on a group trip I'd planned for this week. Now the trip has fallen through entirely so, with the pressure off and having discussed it, we both decided to return gear she wasn't in love with and take our time sorting gear she will be.

I'm pretty sure that with patience we'll be able to procure some top notch used gear that wasn't even available at our local store and at the same time save cash to put towards our next trip.

And I have to tell you, right now those funds are looking AOK in my bank account and the more organized gear closet isn't bad either!
 

Dreamer

off my rocker
Joined
Jun 14, 2016
Messages
268
return gear she wasn't in love with and take our time sorting gear she will be.
Yeah, it just adds that little something nice when you can pull gear you really mate with night after night out of you pack.
 

Dreamer

off my rocker
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Jun 14, 2016
Messages
268
You need what you need, when you need it. Try to be sensible. I don’t want my gear holding me back, or failing all the time. I really feel quality matters and that, generally, you get what you pay for. A few of the items I carry have been with me twenty years, others brand new and the whole range between. Repair, replace or upgrade as necessary. I get a lot of wear and enjoyment out of my goodies and am grateful for their company on my adventures and the shelter, warmth, and sustenance they grace me.
 

Bob

Trailmaster
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
3,434

  • You remember being slightly sad when the authorities started requiring permits to hike Mount Whitney.
  • You’ve been an REI member for well over half the co-op’s existence. You looked forward to the next REI mail-order catalog because the nearest store was a ten-hour drive away.
Lol ......... Id have to say no to both. Never had a interest in peak bagging, and never have bought anything at REI. My first backpacking trip was in the mid 1970s.
 

Bob

Trailmaster
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
3,434
I've noticed that too. It seems like the only reason some people go hiking is to test their new gear....the rest of the time, they're at home thinking about what other gear they need.
Yep, most of my stuff has been around the block many times. Gets cleaned up and shelved till my next trip, then just gets pulled and packed....... Only change is dried food.....
 

OldBill

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
300
When I think of gear collecting this image always comes to mind. But, HYOH...
BackpackFromHell.jpg
 
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