Something to Ponder

ImNotDedYet

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Sep 28, 2018
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I remember reading an article about the debate around adding cell phone towers to national parks. One of the rangers suggested it was a good idea - which I found odd. His reasoning: we need future generations to care about the wilderness in order to want to preserve it, and the only way to do so is to get them into it. If the only way to get them into it is by including cell towers, then we should do that.

I'm not saying he was right or wrong, but it's certainly something to ponder. And it's something I've remembered each time this topic is brought up. While my preference may lean in a certain direction, the better long term direction just may be the opposite of my preference.
 

IntrepidXJ

ADVENTR
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Joined
Jan 17, 2012
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I remember reading an article about the debate around adding cell phone towers to national parks. One of the rangers suggested it was a good idea - which I found odd. His reasoning: we need future generations to care about the wilderness in order to want to preserve it, and the only way to do so is to get them into it. If the only way to get them into it is by including cell towers, then we should do that.

I'm not saying he was right or wrong, but it's certainly something to ponder. And it's something I've remembered each time this topic is brought up. While my preference may lean in a certain direction, the better long term direction just may be the opposite of my preference.

Yeah, but what if this is what happens when you attract those people: https://www.fresnobee.com/news/nation-world/national/article248150090.html

Won't be much left worth preserving in the long run anyway....

If COVID has shown us anything this past year, it's exactly what happens when a large amount of people who have no desire to learn how to recreate responsibly in the backcountry shows up...and it ain't pretty....
 
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swmalone

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Apr 27, 2016
Messages
341
I turn my phone to airplane mode when I'm out, even if there is a cell signal. I do use it for GPS and as a camera, but prefer not to have calls, texts, or other alerts when I'm in the wilderness. My wife has taken to confiscating her Mom's phone when we go hiking or into parks because she seems to have at least a mild addiction.

A bit of a story. A few years ago we took my at the time 17 year old nephew to hike Bald Mountain. When we got to the top all of the sudden he has his phone in front of his face and takes off walking. He was playing Pokemon Go and there were Pokemon to collect up there. I was worried he was going to walk right off the edge.
 

WasatchWill

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Jul 23, 2013
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I once dropped my phone at the Citadel. I watched it happily bounce down the cliff face. I was mad for a second then recovered my sanity.
I have a friend that was out with a group passing through in the canyon below once. They're pretty sure they stumbled upon a midden underneath the Citadel there. Maybe your phone made it into that same heap of historic waste.
 
Joined
May 3, 2018
Messages
257
My biggest fear is when SpaceX gets their satellite internet up and running that suddenly you will see thousands of IT workers spending full 14 days at back-country CG's with their laptops working away. This i think will be a colossal issue in Washington. The WORK FORM HOME phase that started during these lock-downs, though I like as it makes my commute to work a lot faster as 80% of people are off the road, has unfortunately been nuking the home prices in mountain towns as the IT people want to WFH up in the mountains :(

which I'd do to if I was in the same fortunate situation but it seems the white collar scene has such an advantage over us blue collar guys these days (and expanding wealth gap) that we will be locked in place for good. /pessimistic rant
 

Rockskipper

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Jun 11, 2017
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I think some of the work from home people are going to eventually find that home can also mean places like India. And more companies are starting to prorate wages based on the cost of living wherever the home might be, which will typically mean lower wages for many. And yes, the WFH people are driving up real-estate prices, but the incredibly low interest rates are even more of a driving force. Every percent lower typically will increase house prices by 10%. It's a feeding frenzy even in places like Indiana, it's not just in the mountains and scenic towns, though they're also getting hit.
 

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