Something to Ponder

Jackson

I like to go outside.
.
Joined
May 31, 2015
Messages
2,285
Solid read, and I agree with the author cell service being a form of development of wild areas. I guess if we ever get to the point that there's cell service deep in the backcountry, I'll start leaving my phone in the car and just carry a digital camera since that's my primary use for my phone. Maybe I should start doing that now anyway. Haha.
 

Kmatjhwy

Wilderness Wanderer
Joined
Sep 23, 2016
Messages
494
Gosh, I hate cellphones! Why can't people leave those freaking hideous cellphones at home when they go for a simple walk in the woods. I do not have a freaking cellphone and I will NOT NOT NOT get one! Think in March after I leave work, this spring go back into those mountain and desert wilds, live and enjoy life, and very possibly disappear for this modern society has become soooo much like a gigantic insane asylum in my opinion. How much do I hate to see this intrusion into any wild area. Again can't people go without and live life in how people in the past lived when there were no computers or cellphones around at all!

Just my opinion. Wishing Everyone the Bestl
 

Udink

Relax, slip away...
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
1,464
Gosh, I hate cellphones! Why can't people leave those freaking hideous cellphones at home when they go for a simple walk in the woods. I do not have a freaking cellphone and I will NOT NOT NOT get one! Think in March after I leave work, this spring go back into those mountain and desert wilds, live and enjoy life, and very possibly disappear for this modern society has become soooo much like a gigantic insane asylum in my opinion. How much do I hate to see this intrusion into any wild area. Again can't people go without and live life in how people in the past lived when there were no computers or cellphones around at all!

Just my opinion. Wishing Everyone the Bestl
Wow.
 
Last edited:

TheMountainRabbit

"Because it's there."
Joined
Feb 15, 2020
Messages
37
I'm against intentional imposition of technology into wild spaces - especially designated wilderness and sensitive areas, but I think it's important that we understand full connectivity will be a reality worldwide in the very near future - there's no stopping that at this point.

I'd be a hypocrite to complain too much anyway - my inReach is practically a cell phone at this point and has made my more extensive trips so much easier to handle for those I leave at home. (Specifically, my wife and two young children.) It's probably the most important item I own when it comes to getting the most possible "bag nights" each year.

I'm not a fan of unnecessary infrastructure in the wilderness - especially when it will be outdated and deprecated in short order - but personal technology in the backcountry is just one more item on the "H.Y.O.H." list for me.
 

Rockskipper

No ETA
.
Joined
Jun 11, 2017
Messages
2,842
I don't mind cell phones in the backcountry. It's very reassuring to be able to check the weather if it looks like something bad's coming in. I don't have a smartphone, but I have called friends for weather updates or other info when there was service. I personally think it's all how you use a phone and how addicted you are to it. Cellphones are a nice safety factor, but you need a backup plan. Ditto for route finding. But it really can be fun to connect with others when way out in your tent in the middle of nowhere, especially if you're feeling depressed, scared, or just rootless. Since I always camp solo, I have used my old flip phone to call a friend once in awhile when I think I hear alligators in the bushes (IOW to abate irrational fears, since I never actually camp where there are alligators).

The only thing I object to is cluttering up the landscape with the towers. I'd rather not have cellphones than have the towers. And those who are addicted to them are really missing out on true solitude.
 

Jackson

I like to go outside.
.
Joined
May 31, 2015
Messages
2,285
After reading everyone else's responses, I should clarify that why I wouldn't want a phone if there was service is because I wouldn't want to have the temptation to switch over to Instagram or something. It's mostly a personal problem because the decision would be mine to access it in the first place.

I carry an inreach so my wife can ensure that I'm not dead or seriously injured, so I'm already texting someone on all my trips into the backcountry.
 

Outdoor_Fool

Member
.
Joined
Dec 11, 2015
Messages
1,657
Good read, thanks @scatman

I am so disgusted with cell phones in the back country that I drowned mine in Pebble Creek in 2019. OK, I did not do that intentionally, I tripped over a rock in the pool at the lower of the 2 middle crossings and ended up drowning it. Pretty expensive foul-up. Oops!

Luckily we do have the option of leaving our phones behind (or off) to quiet our own experience.

While not advocating criminal behavior, I can only imagine the expense of repairing a cell tower that has been hit with several rounds of high-powered ammo.

I do like my In-Reach so hopefully nobody starts shooting satellites down.
 

scatman

Member
.
Joined
Dec 23, 2013
Messages
1,619
I don't mind cell phones in the backcountry. It's very reassuring to be able to check the weather if it looks like something bad's coming in. I don't have a smartphone, but I have called friends for weather updates or other info when there was service. I personally think it's all how you use a phone and how addicted you are to it. Cellphones are a nice safety factor, but you need a backup plan. Ditto for route finding. But it really can be fun to connect with others when way out in your tent in the middle of nowhere, especially if you're feeling depressed, scared, or just rootless. Since I always camp solo, I have used my old flip phone to call a friend once in awhile when I think I hear alligators in the bushes (IOW to abate irrational fears, since I never actually camp where there are alligators).

The only thing I object to is cluttering up the landscape with the towers. I'd rather not have cellphones than have the towers. And those who are addicted to them are really missing out on true solitude.

Well I can see where I stand on your "Friends" tree since I haven't gotten a call. :p :D
 

Rockskipper

No ETA
.
Joined
Jun 11, 2017
Messages
2,842
Good read, thanks @scatman

I am so disgusted with cell phones in the back country that I drowned mine in Pebble Creek in 2019. OK, I did not do that intentionally, I tripped over a rock in the pool at the lower of the 2 middle crossings and ended up drowning it. Pretty expensive foul-up. Oops!

Luckily we do have the option of leaving our phones behind (or off) to quiet our own experience.

While not advocating criminal behavior, I can only imagine the expense of repairing a cell tower that has been hit with several rounds of high-powered ammo.

I do like my In-Reach so hopefully nobody starts shooting satellites down.
My brother drowned his in his beer (intentionally) in a bar somewhere in Wyoming. I know, cause I was on the other end of the call. :rolleyes:

So, where does one acquire such ammo? (Asking for a friend.)
 

Wyatt Carson

Desert Vagabond
Joined
Apr 15, 2015
Messages
296
Interesting replies. Lol
I’ve carried an iPhone while in designated wilderness for years but 99.9% of the time it’s set on airplane mode. I really don’t need a cell signal most of the time but some people like to have an option to say goodbye when they know they probably won’t make it. Rob Hall called his wife on a sat phone to say goodbye as he lay dying on Everest.
Currently I carry an iPhone 12 Pro Max for its 4 stellar cameras, lidar, excellent maps and gps, bookshelf of plant references and other features that don’t weigh anything extra. Sky Guide for detailed star charts is valuable. That and some other apps even use augmented reality. While I mostly use it as a camera I did expect an important financial call once and didn’t want to sit around the hacienda waiting so I did take that call in deep wilderness. Nobody else was around so it was productive and didn’t bother any luddites. Then we tramped merrily on our way.
It also has features and apps for the legally blind, one of which I am. I’m using on my iPad right now to make this post called Voice Dream Writer. I also have Voice Dream Scanner and Reader to handle printed media I’d otherwise not be able to read.
So it’s actually used a very minimal amount of time but it does things with its cameras that other stand alone cameras can’t do and it has features that really help me get a precise focus where I want it. I’ve been a photographer for 50 years and I’ll not let a bit of blindness stop me now. Lol If we ever find ourselves in a Rob Hall situation we might even take it off airplane mode. Ha ha...
 

gnwatts

Member
.
Joined
May 19, 2012
Messages
1,806
Hiking down a canyon one time, I sat down to adjust my pack, then started walking back up canyon. Technically I was lost, if only for an hour or two. I was a little embarrassed, even though I was by myself.
I just started carrying a cell phone on trips a few years ago, but only for taking short videos.This last float trip I used it to pinpoint my location. I thought I would like it. But I don't think I will use it again for that purpose.

I kind of enjoy being lost, figuratively and physically. There is that initial panic, but then there is acceptance, and I just go with it. Relax, look at my compass and map (assuming I remembered to pack them), check the sun position etc. I eventually find my way. I have on occasion set cairns quite often walking across a mesa somewhere, then kick them over on my return, assuming I am not lost on my return. I guess if I injure myself in the backcountry and can't move, like I said earlier I would panic for a bit. Now in that moment, if I logically considered my situation, I would probably wish I had a phone with GPS with a wireless tower nearby.
I think there should be places on this earth where people can get lost, or get in trouble.

Checking my email or seeing if someone liked a pic I posted on Instagram can wait until I get home. Getting away from all of the worlds shit is one of the reasons I venture out to begin with.
I totally agree with the article that Scatman posted.
 
Last edited:

gnwatts

Member
.
Joined
May 19, 2012
Messages
1,806
My brother drowned his in his beer (intentionally) in a bar somewhere in Wyoming. I know, cause I was on the other end of the call. :rolleyes:

So, where does one acquire such ammo? (Asking for a friend.)
I once dropped my phone at the Citadel. I watched it happily bounce down the cliff face. I was mad for a second then recovered my sanity.
 

canadug

Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2015
Messages
65
We absolutely do not need cell reception in the backcountry..........It is so sad to be backpacking in the Sierra Range and come across a large group of people at a pass and they are all yapping on their phones.
 
Last edited:

Don't like ads? Become a BCP Supporting Member and kiss them all goodbye. Click here for more info.

Top