GYE resources

wsp_scott

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I am shocked that not one map company does a map of the Teton Wilderness or really anything between the Winds and Yellowstone. I'm aware of the Forest Service maps but in a lot of cases, they haven't been updated in a while.

I stumbled across "Greater Yellowstone & Grand Teton Recreation Atlas" https://www.amazon.com/Greater-Yellowstone-Grand-Teton-Recreation/dp/0929591305 It seems like this would be a good overview of the GYE. Not something for navigating, but for the big overview of the area. Has anyone seen this?

Any idea about this one "Backpacking Wyoming: From Towering Granite Peaks to Steaming Geyser Basins" https://www.amazon.com/Backpacking-Wyoming-Towering-Granite-Steaming/dp/0899975054/


I also found this "Atlas of Yellowstone" https://smile.amazon.com/Atlas-Yellowstone-W-Andrew-Marcus/dp/0520379772/
It looks to be looks to be an awesome resource for the park. I'm going to drop some hints to my wife and maybe I'll get something useful this year :)
 

LarryBoy

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Select Peaks of the Greater Yellowstone by Thomas Turiano is out of print, but is a great resource for the areas mentioned even if you don't actually bag peaks. I haven't been able to get my hands on a copy, but have gleaned a bunch of useful tidbits over the years from various archive sites that have excerpts digitized.

He mentioned last summer that he was working on a new edition and expected it to be available soon. But as of yet, crickets.
 

TheMountainRabbit

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Select Peaks of the Greater Yellowstone by Thomas Turiano is out of print, but is a great resource for the areas mentioned even if you don't actually bag peaks. I haven't been able to get my hands on a copy, but have gleaned a bunch of useful tidbits over the years from various archive sites that have excerpts digitized.

He mentioned last summer that he was working on a new edition and expected it to be available soon. But as of yet, crickets.
I've been looking for a copy of this for a couple years now - I once got it from the local library, but that copy appears to have disappeared. If you find it available - or hear any more about the new edition - I'd love to know.
 

regehr

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yeah I'll second the Turiano book, it's totally great. nice to hear there's a new edition in the works.

Backpacking Wyoming is pretty good, for example it has a nice loop or two in the Gros Ventres and some stuff in the Absorakas
 

regehr

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BE51AE07-8CC6-4036-9D4D-8C7FA1BB30E2.jpeg


Here you can see how Backpacking Wyoming represents different parts of the region
 

regehr

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sorry for upside down, the picture is right side up on my phone
 

TractorDoc

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I know what you mean about the Teton Wilderness.
I recently purchased a forest service map (for a certain potential future trip ;) ) and it was last updated in the 80s. I also thought it was quite heavy!

Some of the best resources go by @Bob or @scatman or @TheMountainRabbit (plus others) here on BCP.

As far as books specific to the park a copy of Janet Chapple's "Yellowstone Treasures" is a good roadside resource, but not so helpful for the backcountry. I have about every Yellowstone hiking guide published -- sometimes I even seek out earlier editions that describe trails since abandoned or provide some perspective on the park pre '88 fires. T. Scott Bryan's "Geysers of Yellowstone" is referenced by me weekly. . . I've also acquired books on Yellowstone's waterfalls, butterflies, and amphibians (all separate books) that provide subtle details of areas both inside and outside the park.

Perhaps a positive is that if the area has a lack of publicity it will not be overrun by an abundance of people? :thinking:
 

Bob

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Rather not have one...... Everytime guides are creator the areas get hammered.......although the internet does that as well. Yes I am guilty like most in producing pics and routes.

Places that were once very wild are not so much anymore, way it goes tho. One can just hope people would take better care of places more than some do.......

I pretty much use topo mapping programs and google earth exclusively now.
 

Jackson

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I am shocked that not one map company does a map of the Teton Wilderness or really anything between the Winds and Yellowstone. I'm aware of the Forest Service maps but in a lot of cases, they haven't been updated in a while.

I stumbled across "Greater Yellowstone & Grand Teton Recreation Atlas" https://www.amazon.com/Greater-Yellowstone-Grand-Teton-Recreation/dp/0929591305 It seems like this would be a good overview of the GYE. Not something for navigating, but for the big overview of the area. Has anyone seen this?

Any idea about this one "Backpacking Wyoming: From Towering Granite Peaks to Steaming Geyser Basins" https://www.amazon.com/Backpacking-Wyoming-Towering-Granite-Steaming/dp/0899975054/


I also found this "Atlas of Yellowstone" https://smile.amazon.com/Atlas-Yellowstone-W-Andrew-Marcus/dp/0520379772/
It looks to be looks to be an awesome resource for the park. I'm going to drop some hints to my wife and maybe I'll get something useful this year :)
Yeah I have what I think is the Forest Service one. Teton and Washakie wilderness. Has a number of "location approximate" trails and is out of date, but it's not that bad. I'd still buy it again if I lost mine or something.
 

Bob

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Lol.. . Usfs maps I have are from the 1980s
 

wsp_scott

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I totally agree about guide books not being the greatest for the area, but I'd like to see a broad overview of an area, some of the highlights, then its easier to do some research or ask some questions. Given the fires of the last 30 years, a map/guidebook can end up out of date pretty fast. It would be nice if the forest service map wasn't almost 20 years old.

Anyone seen the first book I mentioned "Greater Yellowstone & Grand Teton Recreation Atlas"?
 

LarryBoy

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I totally agree about guide books not being the greatest for the area, but I'd like to see a broad overview of an area, some of the highlights, then its easier to do some research or ask some questions. Given the fires of the last 30 years, a map/guidebook can end up out of date pretty fast. It would be nice if the forest service map wasn't almost 20 years old.

Anyone seen the first book I mentioned "Greater Yellowstone & Grand Teton Recreation Atlas"?
I've got the Falcon Guide for the Teton & Washakie Wildernesses. It's more or less your standard Falcon - serviceable but not superb. Focuses mostly on the corridor trails but that's to be expected.

Now if @Kmatjhwy ever wrote a a guidebook, that's something I'd pay a pretty penny for!
 

regehr

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I nosed around Turiano's website, he even has a discussion forum, but it's been highly inactive in recent years and there's nothing there that I could find about a new version of his book. hopefully if anyone hears any news about this, they'll post here
 

kwc

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We have these two older books on Yellowstone, not sure if they’re helpful at all … the Sierra Club book was purchased in 1975. The day hiking book is from 1990 or so.

1E74650B-04B2-40C6-A3DD-F0F0D207EE9F.jpeg
 

Absarokanaut

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I've found the weatherproofed Forest Service Map to be fine. I horse packed the Teton and Washakie Wildernesses a fair amount as a boy and young man. The Teton is home to the remotest point in the 48 States. Not surprising it hasn't garnered much social media attention, coordinates, etc.

I have the Falcon Guide to the Teton and Washakie Wildernesses. I think its Ok but of course open to critique.

That Sierra Club Totebook is awesome, Orville is a legend in this part of the world.
 

Outdoor_Fool

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I've certainly used guidebooks in the past but the past 2-3 decades I prefer looking at the maps and more recently, Google Earth, and figuring out what looks inviting for me, whether on- or off-trail. My self-created treks are inherently more rewarding than a guidebook-derived trip, even when I need to make corrections on the fly.
 

TheMountainRabbit

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I've been looking for a copy of this for a couple years now - I once got it from the local library, but that copy appears to have disappeared. If you find it available - or hear any more about the new edition - I'd love to know.
Found it! This thread inspired me to dig a little more and I got a copy to my local library - via the University of Wyoming.

20221210_101118.jpg
 

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