Backpacking Northern Windriver Range, solo 60+ miles, 5 days, mid September 2018

Don't like ads? Become a BCP Supporting Member and kiss them all goodbye. Click here for more info.

Joined
Jan 14, 2017
Messages
46
Trip Reports
3
Likes
84
Thread starter #1
Hi again!
I had so much fun hiking the Winds in August, I wanted to do one more trip I had not yet done before: a thru-hike in the Northern part of the range starting at Green River Lakes, heading South to scale Knapsack Cole, visit Titcomb Basin, then on to Lake Victor and make my way to the Boulder Lake Trail Head, hopefully hearing the Elk bugle along the way. It was later in September (the 17th) than I wanted though, but the weather forecast looked mostly dry and my wife was willing to drop me off then later pick me up at Boulder Lake. I couldn't pass that up!

What actually happened Itinerary (it changed from the original plan):
Sept 17: Drive 6 hours to Green River Lakes, then boogie on the Highline Trail following the Green River to Three Forks Park before dark (11.5+ miles).
Sept 18: Climb to Vista Pass, then up to Cube Rock Pass, then up and over Knapsack Col then down into Titcomb Basin (a LONG DAY 15 miles).
Sept 19: Explore through Titcomb and further on to Island Lake, then off-trail to Wall Lake (9.5 miles).
Sept 20: Navigate around Wall Lake to Cook Lakes, then back on the Highline Trail heading South past Pole Creek Lakes to Chain Lakes (9 miles).
Sept 21: Continued South past Barnes Lake and Horseshoe Lake, checked out Lake George and Coyote Lake, then on the Ruff Lake Trail to the Boulder Lake Trailhead (15+ miles).

Pack ready to go: A full 85 Liter pack for this trip with gear including 17 lbs of food for 6 full days and 10 extra pounds of clothing and sleeping gear (than I normally carry) for the colder weather (temps dropping in the low 20's), gear for rain/snow, plus 2 closed-cell sleeping pads for my dogs to help them stay warm at night. 50 + lbs!
20180916_204631.jpg

Day #1
My dear wife dropping me off at Green River Lakes and sending me off.
20180917_141222.jpg
20180917_141229.jpg

I started around 2:30 pm that 1st day. It was the warmest and nicest day of the trip. SMOKEY, but bug free.
20180917_142727.jpg

Square Top Mountain was ahead of me for the 1st 3 miles. Hazy, but gorgeous.
20180917_152717.jpg
20180917_160743 (2).jpg

The aspens that grow in the lower elevations (8,500' or lower) showing their fall-colored glory.
20180917_163027.jpg

The trail that day followed the Green River the entire way including Three Forks Park were I camped that 1st night. After passing Square Top, I did not see another person till Day #3 in Titcomb Basin.
20180917_164124.jpg

Just past Square Top I was impressed by this well built foot bridge crossing the Green River. Even this late in the year the Green River this far up in the Winds was full of water. Grateful to keep my feet dry.
20180917_180133.jpg

Just a few days before a huge fire started 40 miles away at Hoback Junction that would plague me with smoke most of the trip. The pic below looks like the sun has gone down, but it was 4 in the afternoon with the sun up and blocked by the smoke. I would occasionally see ash falling out of the sky. A little eerie to experience. Still happy to be there!
20180917_182436.jpg

I made it to Three Forks Park just as the sun was setting. For a few minutes the smoke cleared a bit, allowing a few stellar sun setting pics.
20181016_121117.jpg
20181016_121203.jpg

The dogs still have their summer coats, so to help them (especially the lab) not freeze at night they brought along their own very fashionable (I found the sweaters on clearance at Walmart a few years ago for cheap) dog sweaters. They never acted too put-out by them.
That night we woke up hearing our 1st Elk bugle in the wild - around 2am. The dogs were not familiar with that sound and were freaking out and I almost didn't stop them from taking off in the middle of the night after the Elk, but they settled down quickly and we went back to sleep. Way cool to hear the Elk!
20181016_121444.jpg

Day #2
The night before it actually rained for about 20 minutes and the first part of the day was fairly clear of smoke, and much cooler. From this point I would ascend 4,000 vertical feet for the next 12 miles.
View of Three Forks Park looking South.
20181016_134352.jpg

Very nice fall colors even on the switchbacks.
20181016_153047.jpg

This junction sign was a little confusing and was grateful for my Garmin GPS. I headed towards "Elbow Lake".
20181016_160234.jpg

Not long after this sign made much more sense and I turned here towards Vista Pass.
20181016_162436.jpg

Vista Pass, and a nice place to camp if need be, but I continued on towards Dale Lake. The weather so far was cool and perfect for backpacking, gaining elevation the entire route so far.
20181016_165136.jpg

After Vista Pass, you DROP elevation for a while, and I was not very excited losing altitude. I must admit though the views and solitude took away any disappointments of losing elevation.
20181016_171643.jpg

Looking back into the glacial valley of the Green River were I camped the night before.
20181016_172323.jpg

From here the trail is not maintained and disappears completely while navigating uphill through massive boulders and boulder fields. This is what was ahead of me.
20181016_172845.jpg

In the last 24 hours hauling a 50+ pack, hiking 16+ miles, climbing over 2,000 feet I was beginning to feel it, which surprised me little. The last 4.5 miles took me over 3 hours - very slow for me. I think this pic tells it all how I was feeling..
20181016_173113.jpg

I really wanted to ascend the Col that day, so I dropped my pack, took off the dogs' packs which Diesel (the Lab) was happy to be rid of..
20181016_173537.jpg

and chilled for an hour while eating copious amounts of high-energy (calories and protein) foods..
20181016_173749.jpg
20181016_173808.jpg

While enjoying the view, and sunshine.
20181016_173837.jpg

Now it was boulder hopping/scrambling/try-not-to-fall-or-injure-yourself/climbing. Slow going to say the least.
20181016_185134.jpg
20181016_185141.jpg

See the small area of "green" grass in the background past the boulder field? Going from there to were this picture was taken took 45 minutes!
20181016_191658.jpg

Soon we headed left just past were Ollie (the dog) is and in classic Windriver fashion the scenery abrupt changed:
20181016_191943.jpg

Dale Lake and Stroud Peak.
20181016_192352.jpg

Walking past Dale Lake towards Cube Rock Pass. Is this the "Cube"?
20181016_192553.jpg

Looking back over Dale Lake. I was awestruck with the views around me.
20181016_193124.jpg

Peak Lake with Split Mountain in the background. Many camp here for the night and THEN ascend Knapsack Cole, but I had at least 4 hours of daylight and was determined to reach the Col so I continued on around the lake (to the left).
20181016_193603.jpg

Finally I could see Knapsack Col for the first time.
20181016_195130.jpg

This is looking North over the outlet of Peak Lake feeding this little body of water. The smoke was coming back in.
20181016_195621.jpg

Sulphur Peak and Peak Lake.
20180918_154711.jpg

Looking back at Cube Rock Pass. Not much of a pass, really. But maybe at this elevation any amount of elevation gain and loss counts for a "pass"?
20180918_155830.jpg

Knapsack Col! This glacial valley was AMAZING. I believe the mighty Green River begins here too.
20180918_162053.jpg

Nice nose shot, right?
20180918_162622.jpg

Incredible Granite peaks and ridges, massive glaciers, vertical snow shutes multiple waterfalls and high alpine meadows all in ONE photo!
20180918_164129.jpg

This is a special place. I will be back again, hopefully without the smoke!
20180918_164250.jpg

Climbing higher and looking back at the relentless smoke..
20180918_165702.jpg

which at least allows for some very nice pics of the setting sun and silhouettes coming off the little camera lens on my smartphone. :)
Sulfur Peak I think.
20180918_170347.jpg

After Peak Lake I was bonking (hitting the wall) big time. Was it all the smoke combined with the altitude and heavy pack?
20180918_171513.jpg

Soon I came across this little patch of glacial turf, normally covered in snow for most of the year. The ground here was soft and with plenty of fresh water.
20180918_173002.jpg

This little "spot of turf" was around 11,700 feet, and with no danger of storms in the forecast that night or any clouds to speak of, hindsight I should have camped here for the night then gone over the Col the next morning. The views were incredible. Camping at 11,700 would have been a 1st for me, but..
20180918_173012.jpg

I instead continued pushing and punishing myself as I made my goal of reaching the Col that day.
20180918_183419.jpg

The sun had not set yet but was completely blocked out by smoke from the Hoback fire.
20180918_184535.jpg
20180918_184545.jpg

Finally reached Knapsack Col! The look on my face tells it all: Now I have to go down this thing (with only an hour of daylight left)!
20180918_190416.jpg

What lay ahead of me: a massive glacial valley with nothing but boulder fields (after the glacier of course). I only had an hour of daylight left.
20180918_191409.jpg

I did manage to take a few more pics in the fading light. Looking back at the Col and glacier. The glacier was solid ice and a little treacherous without spikes. Then the boulder fields, with NOWHERE to make a camp, and no trail to follow (if it exists I lost it in the dark). The only choice I had was to continue down.
20180918_194429.jpg

To make things worse, a Gail-force wind picked up blowing up the valley I was trying to go down through. In the dark I had to scramble/stubble through 2.5 more miles of this with just a headlamp lighting up a few feet in front of me and the wind blowing me back. I crossed a large fast moving stream draining this glacial nightmare 3 times before I found a place to set up camp (3 hours later at upper Titcomb Lake). The last 2 hours SUCKED ROCKS!, lol..Finally had dinner at 10:30 that night before gratefully crawling in my sleeping bag. The dogs were tired too. That was a long day, over 12 hours of hiking and 15 miles.
20180918_194434.jpg

Day #3
The wind blew all night and cleared out the smoke. It was a beautiful, calm morning. Neither me or the dogs stirred much till mid morning. Looking back at where we came from the night before. What you cannot see is glacial valley and the Col that are around the corner, left.
20180919_103525.jpg

Hello Titcomb lake (upper).
20180919_104358.jpg

I took it easy packing up and headed out of the Basin.
20180919_133058.jpg

Lower Titcomb Lake.
20180919_133420.jpg

And the people were there. This is the 2nd most popular destination in the Windrivers (the Cirque of the Towers is 1st).
20180919_135732.jpg

Easily can see why. Looking back North.
20180919_140333.jpg
20180919_140937.jpg

Goodbye Titcomb. This day was going to be an easy one compared to the day before. No more off-trail, glacial field/boulder hopping hiking-in-the-dark for me!
20180919_143111.jpg

The junction towards Indian Basin. Will visit that basin someday.
20180919_144216.jpg

There are few unnamed lakes just South of Titcomb.
20180919_144219.jpg
20180919_144850.jpg

Island Lake.
20180919_150207.jpg

Just past this beach I turned left as was soon off trail again, and gaining elevation. The beach would have been tempting the air temps were warmer than 50 degrees that day.
20180919_150340.jpg

Looking back with a nice view of Island Lake as I was climbing, eventually going off trail towards Wall Lake.
20180919_152559.jpg

20180919_151639.jpg


with Elephant Head to the left
20180919_152019.jpg

There was a bit of a trail now and then heading towards the pass which can be see in the background. Really enjoyed this area between Island Lake and Wall Lake. After Day #2 in Titcomb Basin I saw no one till I passed a few hunters on the last day (Day #5) of the trip.
20180919_153543.jpg
20180919_153547.jpg
20180919_154617.jpg

I wondered how long this massive boulder has been sitting there, on top of the ridge.
20180919_154624.jpg
Looking back from where I came up. It was nice to finally see some clouds that were NOT SMOKE.
20180919_160436.jpg

I came over the pass and glissaded down a small glacier on the other side. This time the snow was soft, not like the last glacier on the Col that was solid ice.
Having a great day, taking my time.
20180919_163011.jpg

First view of Wall Lake.
20180919_164339.jpg

A better view of Wall Lake. The name speaks for itself and I wondered how I was going to get around this lake tomorrow.
20180919_165513.jpg

Unnamed lakes and Peak (at least on my map) above Wall Lake.
20180919_165517.jpg

20180919_165744.jpg

Looking back at what I came down. I chose the least-steep area, which ended up being a major bush wacking experience. Had I done it over I would have chosen the more steeper ascent around and in between the Granite.
20180919_170805.jpg

After setting up camp the wind from the South again picked up as the sun set. I was hoping to fish this lake, I've heard there are some big ones here, but the wind made it not the best time to try any fishing.
20180919_174425.jpg

Very much enjoyed watching the sunset light up the mountains around me.
20180919_174550.jpg

Yes that is smoke coming in again over the gorgeous sunlight mountains of granite. That night while answering nature's call I again saw ash falling from the sky.
20180919_185148.jpg

I believe this mountain peak is called Faler Tower.
20180919_185826.jpg

Day #4
The wind was still blowing from the South.
I admit I was a little concerned how to get around this lake that was completely surrounded on three sides (South, West and East) by solid Granite. Looking back to the North side of the lake where I camped.
20180920_120524.jpg

It turned out to be a worry-free, cairn-marked route through gentle sloped areas of granite. I soon reached the South-East side of the lake and heading East walked up and over another small pass as. There was a trail most of the way.
20180920_120533.jpg

As I crested over the small pass heading towards Cook Lakes the wind suddenly was gone, and it was as calm as a spring morning. Crazy.
20180920_120942.jpg

I was making my way towards the Fremont Trail, with the idea of heading up to Hat Pass then down to Lake Victor.
20180920_122322.jpg

Cook Lakes. Now the Cold Font arrived, with clouds threatening rain or a rain/snow mix. It was much cooler - never getting above 40 degrees that day. Still beautiful though.
20180920_125240.jpg

Pole Creek Lakes
20180920_125740.jpg
20180920_130347.jpg

The moment of decision: the junction of the Highline Trail and Fremont Trail. I was not liking the idea of climbing above treeline and up to another substantial pass being more exposed to threatening weather, so I changed plans - as often happens in this type of country. Instead of going East on the Fremont trail, I turned South on the Highline Trail towards Chain Lakes where the elevation is lower and relatively the same, meandering through trees and meadows, then after Lake George planned on turning north towards Lake Victor.
In a few hours I realized how fortunate I was to change routes.
20180920_134921.jpg

The views were still very nice. I was enjoying going mostly downhill on this part of the trip.
20180920_140950.jpg

This was the most challenging stream crossing (by Pole Creek Lakes) I had to cross. For September not bad, earlier in the season I'm sure more of a challenge.
20180920_143412.jpg

Another junction. Most people going to and coming from Titcomb Basin pass through here coming from Elkhart Park. I saw no one that day, just me and the dogs.
20180920_144641.jpg

More downhill meandering in the reverie.
20180920_150749.jpg

Approaching the North end of Chain Lakes. It was nice not to have all the smoke - the cold front blew it all out.
20180920_152147.jpg

Another lake in the Chain Lakes. Soon after MY BODY decided it was time to be done for the day - never had this happen before: instantly I had a severely pinched nerve on my upper right hip - so severe that I could no longer walk. All I could do is hobble over to the side of the lake and lay on the ground for a while and figure out what was going on with the right side of my SI joint. This most likely was from that very rough night of hiking down off Knapsack Cole through boulder fields for 2.5 hours which over strained my SI joint, showing up 2 days later.
For 30 minutes I could barely MOVE and THAT wasn't a good sign! I started texting my wife (through my Garmin INreach, via satellite) telling her she might be sending up horses and riders (from the ranch at Boulder Lake) to come get me. Eventually I was able to very slowly hobble to the North end Chain Lakes and find a good camp spot to set up my tent. Good thing I did not go the planned route towards Hat's Pass! I was a bit discouraged though..
20180920_162916.jpg

When I opened up the front of my pack to setup camp, President Russell M Nelson was right there to greet and encourage me. :)
I immediately started to feel better!
20180920_171641.jpg

After getting my tent setup, I decided to walk around the lake for a while and hopefully loosen/relax my back a bit..while fishing of course!
20180920_183747.jpg

Now that the cold front had passed through, the weather was finally calm. The most calm it had been since the first day. It was COLD though..the temperature dropping fast as the sun set.
20180920_184734.jpg
20180920_185236.jpg

The fishing was awesome! These large trout (18 inchers) would hit my spinner hard, then jump out of the water trying to get rid of the hook - very fun catch and release that evening.
20180920_185607.jpg
20180920_190801.jpg

Because of the cold I soon went to bed, hoping and praying I could hike out the next day, a 15+ mile walk. I wasn't sure if I could do it but at least I had plenty of food and supplies for a couple of more days.
20180920_193109.jpg

As the sun set to the west, you could see the solid plume of smoke in the distance, having been blown South by the front coming in. That night we heard more Elk bugling - and this time the dogs didn't freak out about it.
20180920_193746.jpg

Day #5
Diesel valiantly guarding our camp as I packed up. The dogs loved chasing the chipmunks and squirrels NONSTOP.
20180921_092803.jpg

Another smokey day.
Barnes Lake.
20180921_105742.jpg

I was moving along nicely, although my lower back/right hip area reminded me to take it easy.
Nice open valley/meadow halfway between Barnes and Horseshoe Lakes.
20180921_113433.jpg

I was in constant communication for the 1st 8 miles that day with my wife - I love the Garmin INreach! We both decided I could probably make it to the trail head on my own that day, so she left home to come and pick me up as I continued, taking it easy.
Horseshoe Lake.
20180921_120703.jpg

This sign was as confusing on the trail as you see it here..
20180921_124115.jpg

I made a little loop and checked out Lake George. Just North of this Lake I would have turned left on the Highline Trail to Lake Victor, had the SI joint not changed plans. Another time then.
20180921_125824.jpg

A large part of this area was burned out 20 + years ago.
20180921_130426.jpg

Coyote Lake.
20180921_140034.jpg

Common sight in this area: burned out trees with small pines coming up.
20180921_151136.jpg

Lovatt Lake.
20180921_151236.jpg

The first glimpse of the valley towards Boulder Lake. Hard to see because of the smoke again. For about 3 miles I hiked along a mountain ridge going downhill - very enjoyable and my back continued to improve. :)
20180921_152321.jpg

20180921_154516.jpg

First glimpse of Blueberry Lake and Boulder Lake.
20180921_155609.jpg

Boulder Lake and my Sweetie arriving there soon to pick me up. Only problem was 3 + more miles to go. A Zip Line anyone? :)
20180921_161007.jpg

Blueberry Lake.
20180921_161809.jpg

Thirsty dogs at Blueberry. So far that day I had walked 13 miles and dropped 1,300' in elevation with no major SI issues. Another 1,200' and 2 miles downhill to go!
20180921_162800.jpg

Made it! It was AWESOME to meet my wife there, who just arrived 30 minutes before and waiting for me. :)
20180921_172244.jpg

60 + miles in 5 days. The dogs wasted no time to jump in the car and sleep all the way home.
20180921_172757.jpg

The next time I do this trip (oh yes, there will be a next time..), it will be a month earlier, and will plan on climbing over Knapsack the morning of the 3rd day. Adding Lake Victor would definitely require at least 2 more days and another 20 miles. Sounds fun, doesn't it? :)

For those die-hards who want more info and are willing to watch a looong video of this trip:
I think this link takes you to it.

WARNING: a 1 hour and 50 minute video with NO music (still figuring that one out) and NO GUARANTEES you will be entertained by it whatsoever, especially with me narrating the whole thing. I.am.an.amature!
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Don't like ads? Become a BCP Supporting Member and kiss them all goodbye. Click here for more info.

Titans

Member
.
Joined
Aug 18, 2018
Messages
375
Trip Reports
12
Likes
963
#3
Wow- what a trip! Beautiful photos.
The dogs look so tired, they were probably very sore. Did the the dogs run and train with you before doing this trip?
SI joint..... yeah, I had a hyper mobile SI joint for a long time. It’s painful, though a bad case of sciatica is excruciating. Did you fully recover since that?
(It could also have been your sciatica nerve suddenly being pinched badly. It comes and goes without a warning, steep downhill hiking will aggravate it. It can get so bad, one cannot walk or stand without excruciating pain. It sound more like it....)
 

LarryBoy

Hiker Trash
.
Joined
Jan 4, 2015
Messages
1,646
Trip Reports
8
Likes
2,524
#4
Hot dang dude. That's one loooong day from Three Forks Park to Titcomb. You musta been bushed at the end of that.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2017
Messages
46
Trip Reports
3
Likes
84
Thread starter #5
Wow- what a trip! Beautiful photos.
The dogs look so tired, they were probably very sore. Did the the dogs run and train with you before doing this trip?
SI joint..... yeah, I had a hyper mobile SI joint for a long time. It’s painful, though a bad case of sciatica is excruciating. Did you fully recover since that?
(It could also have been your sciatica nerve suddenly being pinched badly. It comes and goes without a warning, steep downhill hiking will aggravate it. It can get so bad, one cannot walk or stand without excruciating pain. It sound more like it....)
The dogs and I regularly trail-run in the Mountains above my home (except in the snow) - and the dogs are always with me. Their feet and joints are tough and handle these trips better than I do - only on the last day did Ollie (the collie mix) show some signs of being tired, but he is getting older for a dog (14 years old now). Diesel the Lab is in his prime and acts like an indestructible machine. I worry about them going through boulder fields and boulder hopping though, but they traverse boulders like monkeys, and have only had to help them a couple of times navigating them.

What you described as the sciatica nerve being pinched nailed it. I'm sure it was aggravated from that crazy downhill in-the-dark boulder/glacier field ascend off of Knapsack Col, because none of the ground was even (there was no "ground" - just granite boulders everywhere), was steep and doing it in the dark made the "walking" worse. It has "talked" to me just a little since the trip, but only after really pushing it with prolonged manual labor like shoveling or concrete or laying pipe for long periods of time (I'm a General Building Contractor). I can still do a 10 mile trail-run and feel good about it after. :)

Sorry about your hyper mobile SI Joint! I used to have worse problems with my SI joint area for years, but that has improved! A regular good diet, regular exercise (focusing on core strength), and regular use of outstanding nutritionals (topical and internal use) have made a huge difference. Anyone who would like more info on what I have found useful, just let me know! (And no, I am not trying to sell anything..)
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2017
Messages
46
Trip Reports
3
Likes
84
Thread starter #6
Hot dang dude. That's one loooong day from Three Forks Park to Titcomb. You musta been bushed at the end of that.
Very long. Bad planning on my part and being stupidly stubborn reaching the Col in one day (kind of like looking at the forest and not seeing the trees). Then I HAD to go down. If it was a day hike no big deal, but with a 50 lb pack..lesson learned!
 

Titans

Member
.
Joined
Aug 18, 2018
Messages
375
Trip Reports
12
Likes
963
#7
The dogs and I regularly trail-run in the Mountains above my home (except in the snow) - and the dogs are always with me. Their feet and joints are tough and handle these trips better than I do - only on the last day did Ollie (the collie mix) show some signs of being tired, but he is getting older for a dog (14 years old now). Diesel the Lab is in his prime and acts like an indestructible machine. I worry about them going through boulder fields and boulder hopping though, but they traverse boulders like monkeys, and have only had to help them a couple of times navigating them.

What you described as the sciatica nerve being pinched nailed it. I'm sure it was aggravated from that crazy downhill in-the-dark boulder/glacier field ascend off of Knapsack Col, because none of the ground was even (there was no "ground" - just granite boulders everywhere), was steep and doing it in the dark made the "walking" worse. It has "talked" to me just a little since the trip, but only after really pushing it with prolonged manual labor like shoveling or concrete or laying pipe for long periods of time (I'm a General Building Contractor). I can still do a 10 mile trail-run and feel good about it after. :)

Sorry about your hyper mobile SI Joint! I used to have worse problems with my SI joint area for years, but that has improved! A regular good diet, regular exercise (focusing on core strength), and regular use of outstanding nutritionals (topical and internal use) have made a huge difference. Anyone who would like more info on what I have found useful, just let me know! (And no, I am not trying to sell anything..)
Im happy to hear the dogs did so well, it’s fantastic they can join you and they are great company too.
My SI joint issues got resolved after great PT. But some years later, after descending from Booth Lake in Vail, I had L4 slip forward on L5. The sciatica nerve pinching was excruciating for some months. I could only calm it down and remove the pain from the acute injury with lots, lots of ice on the lumbar area. The pain in the rear end or down the leg is referred pain. The problem is in the lumbar area. I recognized what you described. But the true recovery and solution is indeed : Core work! I use the level 3 exercises in Tom Danielsons (biker) core exercise book.
Few problems since then, but I’m very careful to avoid very steep descends and Im careful with rotational work under load (like snow/soil shoveling) . And nutrition in general- it’s essential! But core work has been life changing for me.

Great report- thanks for sharing!
 

LarryBoy

Hiker Trash
.
Joined
Jan 4, 2015
Messages
1,646
Trip Reports
8
Likes
2,524
#8
Very long. Bad planning on my part and being stupidly stubborn reaching the Col in one day (kind of like looking at the forest and not seeing the trees). Then I HAD to go down. If it was a day hike no big deal, but with a 50 lb pack..lesson learned!
Yeah man I did kind of the same day in reverse in early July this year. We had quite a bit of snow travel (ice axe and spikes/crampons necessary) going over Knapsack, but we were also going north, so we had quite a bit less vertical gain. My buddy had a comparably heavy pack but he was also in thru-hiker shape so nothing bothered him.
 

Miya

Because I am able.
.
Joined
Dec 31, 2017
Messages
657
Trip Reports
15
Likes
913
#9
Great trip report! I am glad you made it through safely. I hope you don't continue to have similar pains in the future. I have the Garmin too, definitely gives my family peace of mind and can be helpful. Happy to hear you had it in case you weren't able to continue!
Liked seeing the photos with your wife. :) Very sweet.
You have some great fur babies! Do they fit in the tent with you or sleep outside?
 

Don't like ads? Become a BCP Supporting Member and kiss them all goodbye. Click here for more info.

Joined
Jan 14, 2017
Messages
46
Trip Reports
3
Likes
84
Thread starter #11
Yeah man I did kind of the same day in reverse in early July this year. We had quite a bit of snow travel (ice axe and spikes/crampons necessary) going over Knapsack, but we were also going north, so we had quite a bit less vertical gain. My buddy had a comparably heavy pack but he was also in thru-hiker shape so nothing bothered him.
Early July eh? How were the bugs?
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2017
Messages
46
Trip Reports
3
Likes
84
Thread starter #12
Great trip report! I am glad you made it through safely. I hope you don't continue to have similar pains in the future. I have the Garmin too, definitely gives my family peace of mind and can be helpful. Happy to hear you had it in case you weren't able to continue!
Liked seeing the photos with your wife. :) Very sweet.
You have some great fur babies! Do they fit in the tent with you or sleep outside?
Yes they are good dogs - and good companions when I'm out there going solo.The tent I use has side "garages". They both fit under one side comfortably, sleeping on top of the closed cell sleeping pads I carry for them. I hope to find something more compact that can be inflated (maybe?) and insulate them from the cold ground at night.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2017
Messages
46
Trip Reports
3
Likes
84
Thread starter #14
Worst of my life. Absolute misery. Especially in the southern part of the range. Once we got up to the Titcomb area, they weren't nearly as bad.
Yeah man that's been my experience in that range in July..seems like every bug that flies is after your blood, and thick enough they could carry you off.
 
Joined
May 16, 2017
Messages
15
Trip Reports
1
Likes
30
#15
Awesome trip report, I need to go back this year!

Yeah man I did kind of the same day in reverse in early July this year. We had quite a bit of snow travel (ice axe and spikes/crampons necessary) going over Knapsack, but we were also going north, so we had quite a bit less vertical gain. My buddy had a comparably heavy pack but he was also in thru-hiker shape so nothing bothered him.
@LarryBoy: Looking at those pictures I'd say we had it quite a bit easier with all the snow covering those rocks. Plus we climbed the pass first thing in the morning.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2017
Messages
46
Trip Reports
3
Likes
84
Thread starter #17
Awesome trip report, I need to go back this year!



@LarryBoy: Looking at those pictures I'd say we had it quite a bit easier with all the snow covering those rocks. Plus we climbed the pass first thing in the morning.
Yeppers..also coming off Knapsack would'n have been so bad in the daylight.
 

Don't like ads? Become a BCP Supporting Member and kiss them all goodbye. Click here for more info.

Similar threads

Don't like ads? Become a BCP Supporting Member and kiss them all goodbye. Click here for more info.

Top