Yellowstone's Thorofare and the Teton Wilderness 08/09/2023 - 08/18/2023 Part Six / Day Six

TractorDoc

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Day Six: August 14, 2023

There was a buzz of excitement in camp this morning, and it was originating from the area of @scatman 's tent. He was in the early stages of Majo Fever, and the only known cure is to nibble on some Chocolonely at the top of Majo Pass. Majo Pass was the name supposedly given to the divide that separates the Thorofare Creek drainage from the waters flowing down to the North Fork of the Yellowstone River. Because I can be annoying and like to push people's buttons (Mrs. TractorDoc can confirm that :) ) I would periodically call it Mojo Pass. Through day five our route had been relatively tame with minimal elevation gain, but that was about to change. Did I have the Mojo to make it up Majo? You will find out by the end of this post.

Nice trail track noted early on. That is an impressive wolf print if you ask me.

0O7A1385.JPG

It could be said that I have a long stride. This trait meant that on occasion I would push ahead on the trail, then wait a minute or two for the rest of the group to catch up to my position. This is not to say that Hugh, Bob, or Scott have short strides. They could be rather speedy if they wanted to be. Hugh took extra time taking his pictures, Scott often wandered off trial to check out the surroundings, and by now we know that Bob likes his mid-hike naps. Thinking back, the three of those guys seemed rather content to let me walk ahead and scout out the terrain. Maybe there was more to it than me just being quick. . . :thinking:

Such was the case early on day six. I was walking ahead of the group, wondering how much of a challenge getting up Majo Pass would be. I kept a sharp eye on my surroundings and up ahead noticed what I thought was a lone bison grazing near the tree line. I stood and watched it for a minute while thinking to myself that I had not seen a bison over the last five days. This was certainly a strange place to find one.

0O7A1388.JPG

It took several seconds for me to make the connection that this was not a bison, and I slowly began to walk backwards while waving my hands at Bob who was not far behind. What I thought was a bison was actually a very large Grizzly Bear!

0O7A1396.JPG

The picture above shows the bear saw us, but Bob and I must not have looked like much of a threat so it kept grazing. Hugh and Scott had been examining some beaver dams a little farther back on the trail and luckily the bear continued to do bear stuff as they walked up. For the next couple of minutes you would have thought the paparazzi had found its way into the Teton Wilderness from the sound of all the camera clicks. The four of us stood side by side and watched the bear for a couple minutes. It was a lot farther away and difficult to see at the time, but cropping the pictures might suggest the bear has a rough look to it. I hope it survives the winter. :cold:

0O7A1420.JPG

Eventually the sight of four fascinated men must have been too much; the bear gave us a good look and rolled up/back into the trees. An amazing start to day six.

0O7A1421.JPG

Somewhere in the excitement I lost the one thing I failed to pack out with me on this trip -- my camera's lens cap. We were standing in some tall grasses and I spent a couple minutes looking for it without success. It is an 82mm Canon cap; if you happen to be out this way and find it I'll gladly pay the postage to get it back.

@Bob heading towards Yellow Mountain.

0O7A1426.JPG

Looking back towards @wsp_scott and @scatman .

0O7A1427.JPG

Breaking thru a cluster of trees gives us our first hints of where Majo Pass might be (near center of picture), but I don't think we realized it at the time.

0O7A1435.JPG

Not far from here I told Hugh that this was some real "Sound of Music" scenery we had walked into.

0O7A1439.JPG

This was his response. Spinning and singing are all side effects of Majo Fever no doubt.


@Rockskipper made an appearance to see what the commotion was all about.

0O7A1441.JPG

As I waited for Hugh to get up off the ground I took the opportunity to take a picture for the "Swag in the Wild" thread.

CPDay6-2.jpg

Getting closer to the pass.

CPDay6-3.jpg

See the trail thru the willows?

0O7A1451.JPG

The willows were at least as tall as a Scatman's elbow.

0O7A1450.JPG

My mediocre grasp on geology has me thinking a large landslide happened here. . . or maybe an avalanche. . . or maybe just a lot of washout. The mature trees flanking the open grassy slope are definitely telling a story.

0O7A1453.JPG

Our time along Thorofare Creek was coming to an end.

0O7A1458.JPG

Drainage gullies washed out the trail in this section. We followed the grassy flat to the right of the creek.

CPDay6-4.jpg

Majo Pass is just around the corner. I do not think I knew it at the time, but this picture captured a beary special moment. ;)

0O7A1463.JPG

I distinctly remember @scatman was looking at his GPS when I looked up the hill and nonchalantly said "Hugh, there is a bear up there." The Teton Paparazzi then made another appearance. This was a healthy looking blonde haired Grizzly. In the previous picture, the bear is the light dot at the tree line below the sheer rock face towards the left side -- sort of between two pine trees.

0O7A1473.JPG

We watched the bear for a couple minutes before it caught our scent and ran up into the trees. We should have followed it.

Instead we chose to follow something that resembled a trail into the trees at an Easterly direction. The next hour or so was a bit of a blur. If I remember correctly, @scatman had heard from his hairdresser, who heard it from his brother, who heard it from his cousin (twice removed), who heard it from a friend at work, who heard it from a bartender, who heard it from Kevin Bacon that there was a trail leading up to Majo Pass from our approximate location. :D

Or maybe he heard it from Lone Eagle Woman. Either way, our mission (we had no choice but to accept it) was to find that trail.

Things started to look promising as our faint trail began to turn into a recognizable trail with fresh tree cuts and everything. Even though we continued to head in the wrong direction we held out hope that the trail would eventually contour back around to the West. It did not. We ultimately gave into the idea that this was an outfitter's trail that continued up the Thorofare Creek Valley and not the trail that would take us up to Majo Pass.

Rather than retrace our steps down the hillside we decided to bushwhack across the slope in the general direction of the pass. Every @scatman adventure that I have been on has involved hiking thru steep, brushy terrain covered in downfall and this stretch checked that box. I packed the big camera away to make maneuvering easier, so not many pictures were taken during this step of the journey.

This was one I did manage to take.

0O7A1485.JPG

After an unrecorded amount of time pushing thru thick undergrowth we emerged into a clearing and were able to get a first good look at the pass.

Fair warning: many different views of a similar scene forthcoming. :)

0O7A1488.JPG

Looking back towards Thorofare Creek and Yellow Mountain. @Bob is downhill a little to the right of Hugh's hat.

0O7A1490.JPG

@scatman and Yellow Mountain.

CPDay6-7.jpg

@wsp_scott looking up Majo Pass.

CPDay6-6.jpg

While I had the cell phone out I figured I might as well take my picture too. :)

CPDay6-8.jpg

We were happy to have a visual of the pass, but there was still no sign of a trail. We surmised it must be somewhere on the other side of the valley. Rather than search it out we simply took the path of least resistance up the drainage/thru the watershed.

0O7A1492.JPG

Follow the gray cobble road!

0O7A1494.JPG

My long stride must have been a factor as I ended up at the front of our group. I was worried the altitude would have me holding everyone up as we approached 10,000 feet but somehow I kept going.

0O7A1496.JPG

Same picture side by side with the Canon on the left and cell phone on the right. Sometimes the cell phone with its multiple lenses does a better job of blending the bright/dark spots in an image.

0O7A1497.JPG CPDay6-9.jpg

Looking back down the pass.

0O7A1498.JPG

A short cell phone video of some ascent action:


Half trail and half cascade.

0O7A1499.JPG

I saw the snow accumulation up the drainage and noted the large hollow area under it. I don't have much experience in alpine ascents but I did not think walking across a thin snow crust was a good idea. Instead of continuing up the center of the drainage I headed towards the notch in the rocks at the upper right. This was probably not the best approach either as the rocks were loose, crumbly, and at a steeper angle than they looked. I crawled up on my hands and knees and somehow made it to the top without losing my balance and falling back down into the jumble of pointy surfaces below.

0O7A1500.JPG

From this vantage point I was able to make out the faint presence of a trail to my left. I shouted down to Hugh so he might have an easier time finding it from his location. He looks like a dark gray rock near the center of this picture.

0O7A1502.JPG

Looking up and at the trail. I don't think any people or horses had been here for some time.

0O7A1501.JPG

The steepness finally gave way to more gentle terrain towards the top. I chose to wait for the others on the little hill at center right to take advantage of the trees and some shade.

0O7A1504.JPG

Looking back down the pass from the hill. The angle of the sun highlights the trail nicely.

CPDay6-10.jpg

@scatman was the next to arrive. It was a good thing too, as I doubt he could have sustained the effects of Majo Fever much longer. Walking with your arms in the air is one of the signs in the later stages of the disease. :)

0O7A1506.JPG

Glad to be at the top. I neglected to zip my pantlegs back on before today's off trail adventure and my legs showed it. I'm pretty sure Hugh is smiling on this one. :scatman:

0O7A1511.JPG

Group shot! Nothing but happy campers here. We took a rest and Hugh offered everyone some celebratory Chocolonely. I think chocolate bars are more flavorful when one is over 10,000 feet in elevation.

0O7A1518.JPG

It had been a long day and as the symptoms of Mojo Fever began to fade thoughts turned to finding a campsite. We could see a nice spot from the pass and descended down to what would ultimately be my favorite campsite of the trip.

Looking back up at Mojo Pass from the West side. ;)

0O7A1519.JPG

We set up camp next to a small tributary that drained into the North Fork of the Yellowstone River. This spot must have been popular with those that came before us. The ground was littered with small pieces of chert that were likely leftovers from the making of tools, arrow points, etc.

0O7A1521.JPG

0O7A1522.JPG

Camp's water source.

0O7A1523.JPG

The sun and subsequently the temperature dropped quickly so we dressed in our finest outerwear for dinner. Hopefully we still look like a bunch of bada**es instead of a bunch of jacka**es. @Jackson will let us know either way.

GOPR0804.JPG

During the night I attempted another round of astrophotography. I had strategically set up several rocks to use as tripods before darkness fell. Seeing the night sky at this remote location and this elevation was truly something special. The occasional shooting star darted across the sky and I think I saw a string of Starlink satellites before they dispersed.

0O7A1538A.jpg

For round two (of taking night pictures) I woke up a little late to catch the Milky Way before it snuck behind the mountain. The green blob is the result of a small led light on the phone charger in my tent.

0O7A1548A.jpg

Day Six was truly deserving of being called epic. Bear sightings, off trail adventures, a remote mountain pass, and an ultra special campsite would be welcomed and appreciated on their own. . . combine them into one amazing day and I cannot think of a better adjective to describe it.

The unknowns of ascending Majo had been conquered and I felt confident I could handle anything else the next days might throw at us. We were still ahead of schedule as tonight's campsite was intended to be at the bottom of the pass (the East side). I am glad the plan was adjusted and I think it jumpstarted us for tomorrow -- day seven would be another great day that included a descent, an ascent, and a campsite by a lake. Read about it in my next post!

GPS Track for Day Six. I paused the track at the top of the pass during our rest and forgot to start it right away when we got going (in case you were wondering why there was a break in the line).

GPS Track Day 6.jpg
 
I think @scatman purposely led you astray when following that “wrong” trail … he knew all along that there was deadfall nearby and it was calling his name so that’s why you guys ended up finding your way through it. He’s a clever one that @scatman fellow!

Anyways, great photos as always!
Thanks Kevin. The Scatman is always heading in the right direction. Our slight detour may had been related to him feeling the effects of Majo Fever.

Your evocative writing and fantastic photos made me feel like I was there with you. Then I saw that I was!
Whoa. . using some big words there @Rockskipper. I might have to bust out the Thesaurus. :)

The goal of these trip reports is to make the reader feel like they were there with us. . . even if you really were. ;)

Hidden Canyon Pass is up next............ ☠☠
Bring it on @Bob ! I'm still feeling some of the Thorofare in my knees though. You'll have to take it a little easy on me.
 
Upper Thorofare Creek was one of the highlights for me, I definitely want to get back there again. I also need to figure out where that trail actually goes. I might need to combine that with Hidden Canyon :)
 
Bring it on @Bob ! I'm still feeling some of the Thorofare in my knees though. You'll have to take it a little easy on me.
Better start getting in shape now... Head up 3000 ft vert at deer creek start, 2 days up, then good vert just getting into hidden, then have to climb next to a waterfall up to hidden pass, then a day or two not much trail... Will be a interesting trip in probly the wildest part of the wilderness
 
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Great bear encounters and photos! I say it about each day of this trip I've seen, but what a day!

I'm enjoying being the designated judge of the nightly camp dinner shot hahaha. Goes hard, as always!
 
Now what a Great Great Trip Report! Loved It! It brought back many memories from when last I was back in here. Have camped many a time up in those Thorofare Creek Meadows with Yellow Mountain nearby. Then loved that little basin you camped in. When there one morning I had a close close encounter with a Sow Griz with two cubs. Yes the bears seem to be all over in this country. One place where one could go again and again and again with never having a bad day, unless your final day came with some Grizzly. But looked like you were rushing thru all of this marvelous country. Too bad you could not be more like Bob and rest a spell or for some good while enjoying it all. When you get back in here, Hidden Creek will be worth it! In fact there is soooo much country back in here so wild and nice, you could spend all your summer days of your life back in here and still never see it all! Again Great Trip Report and Best to you!
 
By the looks of it, there might be several of us back in this wonderful country next summer. Am thinking of getting back here myself next summer with starting back possibly in late May and then all summer. It has been several years and the wild is calling!

This Great Southern Absaroka Wildlands in my opinion is some of the Best Country Anywhere and still so wild and nice!
 
I am enjoying all reported versions of this trip. It reads like a gentle meander through the backcountry with only my finger on my mouse-scroll wheel complaining about any effort!
I want to go trudge a few miles in backcountry dust, sweat a little, and breathe some unpolluted air just because of reading this.

This is some well-captured, lovely stuff!
 
Day Six: August 14, 2023

There was a buzz of excitement in camp this morning, and it was originating from the area of @scatman 's tent. He was in the early stages of Majo Fever, and the only known cure is to nibble on some Chocolonely at the top of Majo Pass. Majo Pass was the name supposedly given to the divide that separates the Thorofare Creek drainage from the waters flowing down to the North Fork of the Yellowstone River. Because I can be annoying and like to push people's buttons (Mrs. TractorDoc can confirm that :) ) I would periodically call it Mojo Pass. Through day five our route had been relatively tame with minimal elevation gain, but that was about to change. Did I have the Mojo to make it up Majo? You will find out by the end of this post.

Nice trail track noted early on. That is an impressive wolf print if you ask me.

View attachment 126589

It could be said that I have a long stride. This trait meant that on occasion I would push ahead on the trail, then wait a minute or two for the rest of the group to catch up to my position. This is not to say that Hugh, Bob, or Scott have short strides. They could be rather speedy if they wanted to be. Hugh took extra time taking his pictures, Scott often wandered off trial to check out the surroundings, and by now we know that Bob likes his mid-hike naps. Thinking back, the three of those guys seemed rather content to let me walk ahead and scout out the terrain. Maybe there was more to it than me just being quick. . . :thinking:

Such was the case early on day six. I was walking ahead of the group, wondering how much of a challenge getting up Majo Pass would be. I kept a sharp eye on my surroundings and up ahead noticed what I thought was a lone bison grazing near the tree line. I stood and watched it for a minute while thinking to myself that I had not seen a bison over the last five days. This was certainly a strange place to find one.

View attachment 126590

It took several seconds for me to make the connection that this was not a bison, and I slowly began to walk backwards while waving my hands at Bob who was not far behind. What I thought was a bison was actually a very large Grizzly Bear!

View attachment 126591

The picture above shows the bear saw us, but Bob and I must not have looked like much of a threat so it kept grazing. Hugh and Scott had been examining some beaver dams a little farther back on the trail and luckily the bear continued to do bear stuff as they walked up. For the next couple of minutes you would have thought the paparazzi had found its way into the Teton Wilderness from the sound of all the camera clicks. The four of us stood side by side and watched the bear for a couple minutes. It was a lot farther away and difficult to see at the time, but cropping the pictures might suggest the bear has a rough look to it. I hope it survives the winter. :cold:

View attachment 126592

Eventually the sight of four fascinated men must have been too much; the bear gave us a good look and rolled up/back into the trees. An amazing start to day six.

View attachment 126593

Somewhere in the excitement I lost the one thing I failed to pack out with me on this trip -- my camera's lens cap. We were standing in some tall grasses and I spent a couple minutes looking for it without success. It is an 82mm Canon cap; if you happen to be out this way and find it I'll gladly pay the postage to get it back.

@Bob heading towards Yellow Mountain.

View attachment 126594

Looking back towards @wsp_scott and @scatman .

View attachment 126595

Breaking thru a cluster of trees gives us our first hints of where Majo Pass might be (near center of picture), but I don't think we realized it at the time.

View attachment 126596

Not far from here I told Hugh that this was some real "Sound of Music" scenery we had walked into.

View attachment 126597

This was his response. Spinning and singing are all side effects of Majo Fever no doubt.


@Rockskipper made an appearance to see what the commotion was all about.

View attachment 126598

As I waited for Hugh to get up off the ground I took the opportunity to take a picture for the "Swag in the Wild" thread.

View attachment 126627

Getting closer to the pass.

View attachment 126628

See the trail thru the willows?

View attachment 126600

The willows were at least as tall as a Scatman's elbow.

View attachment 126599

My mediocre grasp on geology has me thinking a large landslide happened here. . . or maybe an avalanche. . . or maybe just a lot of washout. The mature trees flanking the open grassy slope are definitely telling a story.

View attachment 126601

Our time along Thorofare Creek was coming to an end.

View attachment 126602

Drainage gullies washed out the trail in this section. We followed the grassy flat to the right of the creek.

View attachment 126629

Majo Pass is just around the corner. I do not think I knew it at the time, but this picture captured a beary special moment. ;)

View attachment 126603

I distinctly remember @scatman was looking at his GPS when I looked up the hill and nonchalantly said "Hugh, there is a bear up there." The Teton Paparazzi then made another appearance. This was a healthy looking blonde haired Grizzly. In the previous picture, the bear is the light dot at the tree line below the sheer rock face towards the left side -- sort of between two pine trees.

View attachment 126604

We watched the bear for a couple minutes before it caught our scent and ran up into the trees. We should have followed it.

Instead we chose to follow something that resembled a trail into the trees at an Easterly direction. The next hour or so was a bit of a blur. If I remember correctly, @scatman had heard from his hairdresser, who heard it from his brother, who heard it from his cousin (twice removed), who heard it from a friend at work, who heard it from a bartender, who heard it from Kevin Bacon that there was a trail leading up to Majo Pass from our approximate location. :D

Or maybe he heard it from Lone Eagle Woman. Either way, our mission (we had no choice but to accept it) was to find that trail.

Things started to look promising as our faint trail began to turn into a recognizable trail with fresh tree cuts and everything. Even though we continued to head in the wrong direction we held out hope that the trail would eventually contour back around to the West. It did not. We ultimately gave into the idea that this was an outfitter's trail that continued up the Thorofare Creek Valley and not the trail that would take us up to Majo Pass.

Rather than retrace our steps down the hillside we decided to bushwhack across the slope in the general direction of the pass. Every @scatman adventure that I have been on has involved hiking thru steep, brushy terrain covered in downfall and this stretch checked that box. I packed the big camera away to make maneuvering easier, so not many pictures were taken during this step of the journey.

This was one I did manage to take.

View attachment 126605

After an unrecorded amount of time pushing thru thick undergrowth we emerged into a clearing and were able to get a first good look at the pass.

Fair warning: many different views of a similar scene forthcoming. :)

View attachment 126606

Looking back towards Thorofare Creek and Yellow Mountain. @Bob is downhill a little to the right of Hugh's hat.

View attachment 126607

@scatman and Yellow Mountain.

View attachment 126631

@wsp_scott looking up Majo Pass.

View attachment 126630

While I had the cell phone out I figured I might as well take my picture too. :)

View attachment 126632

We were happy to have a visual of the pass, but there was still no sign of a trail. We surmised it must be somewhere on the other side of the valley. Rather than search it out we simply took the path of least resistance up the drainage/thru the watershed.

View attachment 126608

Follow the gray cobble road!

View attachment 126609

My long stride must have been a factor as I ended up at the front of our group. I was worried the altitude would have me holding everyone up as we approached 10,000 feet but somehow I kept going.

View attachment 126610

Same picture side by side with the Canon on the left and cell phone on the right. Sometimes the cell phone with its multiple lenses does a better job of blending the bright/dark spots in an image.

View attachment 126611 View attachment 126633

Looking back down the pass.

View attachment 126612

A short cell phone video of some ascent action:


Half trail and half cascade.

View attachment 126613

I saw the snow accumulation up the drainage and noted the large hollow area under it. I don't have much experience in alpine ascents but I did not think walking across a thin snow crust was a good idea. Instead of continuing up the center of the drainage I headed towards the notch in the rocks at the upper right. This was probably not the best approach either as the rocks were loose, crumbly, and at a steeper angle than they looked. I crawled up on my hands and knees and somehow made it to the top without losing my balance and falling back down into the jumble of pointy surfaces below.

View attachment 126614

From this vantage point I was able to make out the faint presence of a trail to my left. I shouted down to Hugh so he might have an easier time finding it from his location. He looks like a dark gray rock near the center of this picture.

View attachment 126615

Looking up and at the trail. I don't think any people or horses had been here for some time.

View attachment 126626

The steepness finally gave way to more gentle terrain towards the top. I chose to wait for the others on the little hill at center right to take advantage of the trees and some shade.

View attachment 126616

Looking back down the pass from the hill. The angle of the sun highlights the trail nicely.

View attachment 126634

@scatman was the next to arrive. It was a good thing too, as I doubt he could have sustained the effects of Majo Fever much longer. Walking with your arms in the air is one of the signs in the later stages of the disease. :)

View attachment 126617

Glad to be at the top. I neglected to zip my pantlegs back on before today's off trail adventure and my legs showed it. I'm pretty sure Hugh is smiling on this one. :scatman:

View attachment 126618

Group shot! Nothing but happy campers here. We took a rest and Hugh offered everyone some celebratory Chocolonely. I think chocolate bars are more flavorful when one is over 10,000 feet in elevation.

View attachment 126619

It had been a long day and as the symptoms of Mojo Fever began to fade thoughts turned to finding a campsite. We could see a nice spot from the pass and descended down to what would ultimately be my favorite campsite of the trip.

Looking back up at Mojo Pass from the West side. ;)

View attachment 126620

We set up camp next to a small tributary that drained into the North Fork of the Yellowstone River. This spot must have been popular with those that came before us. The ground was littered with small pieces of chert that were likely leftovers from the making of tools, arrow points, etc.

View attachment 126621

View attachment 126622

Camp's water source.

View attachment 126623

The sun and subsequently the temperature dropped quickly so we dressed in our finest outerwear for dinner. Hopefully we still look like a bunch of bada**es instead of a bunch of jacka**es. @Jackson will let us know either way.

View attachment 126636

During the night I attempted another round of astrophotography. I had strategically set up several rocks to use as tripods before darkness fell. Seeing the night sky at this remote location and this elevation was truly something special. The occasional shooting star darted across the sky and I think I saw a string of Starlink satellites before they dispersed.

View attachment 126624

For round two (of taking night pictures) I woke up a little late to catch the Milky Way before it snuck behind the mountain. The green blob is the result of a small led light on the phone charger in my tent.

View attachment 126625

Day Six was truly deserving of being called epic. Bear sightings, off trail adventures, a remote mountain pass, and an ultra special campsite would be welcomed and appreciated on their own. . . combine them into one amazing day and I cannot think of a better adjective to describe it.

The unknowns of ascending Majo had been conquered and I felt confident I could handle anything else the next days might throw at us. We were still ahead of schedule as tonight's campsite was intended to be at the bottom of the pass (the East side). I am glad the plan was adjusted and I think it jumpstarted us for tomorrow -- day seven would be another great day that included a descent, an ascent, and a campsite by a lake. Read about it in my next post!

GPS Track for Day Six. I paused the track at the top of the pass during our rest and forgot to start it right away when we got going (in case you were wondering why there was a break in the line).

View attachment 126681

Majo Fever was strong on day six! To be truthful, I don't think I'm over the Majo Fever. Next year I just might have to get vaccinated for it. :thumbsup: Geez, where to begin on this one. This was my favorite day without a doubt, but days seven and eight were right up there too. I think the two grizzlies put this over the to for me.

A Majo disappointment not being able to find the Thorofare Creek end of that outfitters' trail coming down off the east side of the pass. I'm still having nightmares of not sniffing that one out. For now, I'm just going to blame @Rockskipper. I mean what else can I do?

Hey, me and Kevin Bacon are tight. He says he might join us on next year's trip, but only if you choose Hidden Creek. :scatman:

You forgot to mention hearing it from my dead mother. She was crucial in the information chain.

This cairn was the key.
01.jpg

This was located at the edge of the meadow where we saw the blond grizzly. @Rockskipper kept telling me to knock it down. "Knock it down!" she said. "Hold your mules," I said back to her. It is my theory that this is where we should have turned off to find the old trail. Majo Fever led me astray! :sick:

The picture of @Bob heading towards Yellow Mountain is fantastic. I just love that shot. Maybe Bob constructed the cairn just before I laid eyes on it. He's devious with rocks you know. :D

That bushwhack about ended my life. Not to many pictures of that ordeal. Maybe Scott took a few in that mess?

It did feel like some kind of accomplishment when we reached the pass. I so wanted to take that trail back down to see where it went (To the cairn you fool!).

That was an excellent campsite.

Kick the cairn down! Geez, it's like you've been reading peoples post here on BCP or something. :D I've got to go lay down. I can feel the Majo Fever rising up again. Whatever you do, don't catch it.
 
Now Scatman, it was so much more easier I guess in coming down from Majo Pass, then what you guys contended with in going up. Since was on the trail, just continued on down the little route which avoided the little creekbed and all the rocks. But that is such good country always. Do wonder if that 3 foot pile of bottles that I encountered is still back in there.

Remember in coming down, there was some good cliffs immediately on the left with at one point some Bighorn Sheep. Then to the right and below the rocky little creekbed. I went down and over to Thorofare Creek and meadows where I camped and enjoyed everything for some days.

How about Hidden Creek Fever Scat? And also what about that Absaroka Ridge going north from Thorofare Peak to Bruin Peak and Deer Pass where hardly anybody it seems go much. So much darn good country here to get back into and get lost on purpose in, with wandering in and remaining for the rest of one's days.
 
Kmatjhwy...

LOL..... putting together the route for Hidden as you type! Also as a alternate I have the high route from Thorofare to deer creek plotted. Have you been along the crest?

Dont know if i can convince the crew to go out the head of Hidden over into the Yellowstone, looks interesting.
 
Bob, Good For You! Hope you can get Scatman to go since he said that was gonna be his last big hike. Yes have gone up Hidden Creek (West Hidden Creek) up and over the top and down into the North Fork of the Yellowstone. It was Stupendous!!!! Saw Wolverine sign up on the top and freaking Marmots everywhere. And climbed Thunder Mountain while up there. Lots of old native American sign around on top. Found a Bighorn Sheep Skull up on top, which packed out and still have to this day. Go For It!

Now as for along that Absaroka Crest, just some. Had a close Grizzly encounter up on top. Need to get back up in there and just stay a long while.

Also years ago someone would pack a teepee into Hidden Creek and stay there all summer or a good part of the summer. Never met the person. Upper Hidden Creek is soooo gorgeous and stupendous! I personally first visited Hidden Creek - Upper Hidden Creek way back in 1982. Again Go For It!
 
Now Scatman, it was so much more easier I guess in coming down from Majo Pass, then what you guys contended with in going up. Since was on the trail, just continued on down the little route which avoided the little creekbed and all the rocks. But that is such good country always. Do wonder if that 3 foot pile of bottles that I encountered is still back in there.

Remember in coming down, there was some good cliffs immediately on the left with at one point some Bighorn Sheep. Then to the right and below the rocky little creekbed. I went down and over to Thorofare Creek and meadows where I camped and enjoyed everything for some days.

How about Hidden Creek Fever Scat? And also what about that Absaroka Ridge going north from Thorofare Peak to Bruin Peak and Deer Pass where hardly anybody it seems go much. So much darn good country here to get back into and get lost on purpose in, with wandering in and remaining for the rest of one's days.

I think I saw the huge pile of bottles. There was a hint of a trail that died out at an obvious refuse pile (been there a long time). There wasn't a trail, so I told everyone to go back and see what we find in the other direction. There was an obvious trail that we followed for a bit but it kept going up Thorofare Creek and was clearly taking us away from our intended pass, so we got the horrible bushwack. I very much want to figure out where that trail goes :)
 
Trail does kinda "go" on the north side of the drainage, however it gets pretty sketchy at points. Both times, I've bailed down off it and just embraced the bushwhack eventually. The longer you can keep your nerve and stay on the trail, the better.
 
I think I saw the huge pile of bottles. There was a hint of a trail that died out at an obvious refuse pile (been there a long time). There wasn't a trail, so I told everyone to go back and see what we find in the other direction. There was an obvious trail that we followed for a bit but it kept going up Thorofare Creek and was clearly taking us away from our intended pass, so we got the horrible bushwack. I very much want to figure out where that trail goes :)
So you are the reason we had to bushwack ?!? I thought it was Scats fault.
 
An epic day! Those bears were awesome!

You now realize you were bear bait? ;) Come to think about it, they let me pass to the front on a number of occasions too. :eek:

And that camp site looks to be about as good as they get.

Thanks for all the fantastic pics and writing!
 
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