UT public radio interview with author/GC thru-hiker Kevin Fedarko

fossana

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RadioWest just interviewed Kevin Fedarko, author of the excellent Emerald Mile, on his recently published book, A Walk in the Park: The True Story of a Spectacular Misadventure in the Grand Canyon, about hiking the entire 760 mile length of the Grand Canyon in bumbling style over the course of a year with National Geographic photographer, Pete McBride. I didn't care for Colin Fletcher's book on his 1963 GC National Park thru-hike, but I have higher hopes for Fedarko's with his writing style and his focus on conservation.

Context: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/article/grand-canyon-hike-peter-mcbride-kevin-fedarko
 
Sounds like it could be an interesting book, thanks for mentioning it
 
I just read the excerpt from Outside last week. The excerpt goes into some detail about the very start of the journey and sounds very similar to the beginning of Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods. (made into a movie recently with Robert Redford and Nick Nolte, which was OK - the book is a must-read for adventurers or those interested in the history of the AT IMHO) I wonder if the names are not merely coincidental in their similarities.

Ironically, I'd read about this trip from Pete's perspective a few years ago and somehow assumed he was a much better prepared and seasoned outdoorsman.
 
Ironically, I'd read about this trip from Pete's perspective a few years ago and somehow assumed he was a much better prepared and seasoned outdoorsman.
I listened to ~5 hours of the book on a MTB ride yesterday. Fedarko states that McBride is a bit of a huckster in pitching wild story ideas to sponsors. They were chronically underprepared and frequently had to bail. I'd be curious to hear to hear the perspective of Rich Rudow and team, who generously let Fedarko and McBride tag along for the first part of the Rudow team's self-supported journey to do a high traverse of the Grand Canyon in a single push. Rudow and Chris Atwood went on to finish it.
 
I listened to ~5 hours of the book on a MTB ride yesterday. Fedarko states that McBride is a bit of a huckster in pitching wild story ideas to sponsors. They were chronically underprepared and frequently had to bail. I'd be curious to hear to hear the perspective of Rich Rudow and team, who generously let Fedarko and McBride tag along for the first part of the Rudow team's self-supported journey to do a high traverse of the Grand Canyon in a single push. Rudow and Chris Atwood went on to finish it.

The Outside magazine excerpt talks about the pair meeting Rich and his team, and their kind of "shock" at what they were planning on lugging, and their arrogance in thinking they could take equipment shortcuts, etc. It's kind of humorous, yet kind of sad at the same time.
 
Alot out there hiking are the same...I can do that attitude with no experience and subpar equipment and knowledge
 
Just finished listening; it was the perfect accompaniment to Sat. afternoon gardening. I really enjoyed this and thank you, @fossana, for the info. The whole thing was very interesting, and I found especially compelling the part near the end about taking Native American land to create the park. It reminded me of the Glacier NP episode of LIllian Cunningham's excellent podcast Field Trip.
 
I finished the book, and watched the accompanying NatGeo documentary, Into the Canyon, at my neighbor's. They provided complimentary takes on the undertaking.
 
I finished the book, and watched the accompanying NatGeo documentary, Into the Canyon, at my neighbor's. They provided complimentary takes on the undertaking.
I also read the book. It was an interesting read but I don't for a minute believe they were as clueless as they make themselves out to be. There's a reason that the transect has been done so few times.
 
I also read the book. It was an interesting read but I don't for a minute believe they were as clueless as they make themselves out to be. There's a reason that the transect has been done so few times.
On the bulk of that traverse, in particular on the navigationally challenging sections, they were guided by Rich Rudow and friends. They also relied on that same crew for their pack shakedown. In the book Fedarko describes showing up for the first leg with a giant Home Depot tarp instead of the ultralight tent footprints their sponsor provided. Not sure how you get more noob than that.
 
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RadioWest just interviewed Kevin Fedarko, author of the excellent Emerald Mile, on his recently published book, A Walk in the Park: The True Story of a Spectacular Misadventure in the Grand Canyon, about hiking the entire 760 mile length of the Grand Canyon in bumbling style over the course of a year with National Geographic photographer, Pete McBride. I didn't care for Colin Fletcher's book on his 1963 GC National Park thru-hike, but I have higher hopes for Fedarko's with his writing style and his focus on conservation.

Context: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/article/grand-canyon-hike-peter-mcbride-kevin-fedarko
Th Nat Geo film about this showed some of th difficulties…it was well edited and an enjoyable watch.
 
On the bulk of that traverse, in particular on the navigationally challenging sections, they were guided by Rich Rudow and friends. They also relied on that same crew for their pack shakedown. In the book Fedarko describes showing up for the first leg with a giant Home Depot tarp instead of the ultralight tent footprints their sponsor provided. Not sure how you get more noob than that.
 
On the bulk of that traverse, in particular on the navigationally challenging sections, they were guided by Rich Rudow and friends. They also relied on that same crew for their pack shakedown. In the book Fedarko describes showing up for the first leg with a giant Home Depot tarp instead of the ultralight tent footprints their sponsor provided. Not sure how you get more noob than that.
Like I said, I read the book. Also saw the movie. I think they exaggerated their incompetence. They for sure weren't capable of doing the trek by themselves, but they weren't complete "noobs". Just my opinion.
 
Really enjoyed the scenery in the Nat Geo film........They for sure wandered through some real exposed terrain. Quite enjoyed the connection those two have. I have a couple of friends (Who are really family after 30 years of exploring together) where we have that same kind of deep connection. Great to see those kinds of friendships!
 
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