The Subway September 2020 - a trip that went wrong

Yvonne

I lava it!!!
Joined
Jan 19, 2012
Messages
3,843
Those who know me also know that I love hiking the Subway Bottom-up - especially during the hot summer months. I do not mind the boulder hopping or the scramble up the lava cliff at the end of the day. The Subway is just a great trail to play in the water. When Covid hit in March 2020, the Park Service shut down Zion, including all wilderness routes. I was more than disappointed as I couldn't hike the Subway. By the end of September, as summer went by, certain wilderness routes opened up again - including the Subway. Word wasn't officially out yet when I got my permit, so I was delighted to pretty much have the entire hike to myself. It would be my 30th trip to the Subway.
I was so excited to go again that I forgot to prepare for the hike properly. A huge mistake, as I would later learn that day. I just grabbed my backpack, some food and water, and a windbreaker. That was pretty much it. No emergency blanket, no water filter, or extra food which I would usually take with me. My focus was completely on the hike and getting out there and playing. At least I remembered bringing my personal locator beacon and I had charged it the night before.
What else should go wrong? I've done the hike thirty times in the last few years and could do it blindfolded.
I had a late start around 9 am and was the only car at the trailhead. Who else can say they had the Subway trailhead all to themselves during the busy hiking season? I smiled and enjoyed it. The scramble down the 500 ft lava cliff was steep but not too bad at all. I soon reached the Left Fork of North Creek and continued pretty much most of the time in the river.
The water temperature was nice and the outside temperature pleasant. I was having a good time and made good progress.

subway%203%20copy-XL.jpg


subway%204%20copy-XL.jpg

morning reflections

Around mile two was the slab of Kayenta Sandstone with the dinosaur footprints. I always loved to stop here and admire the tracks.

subway%205-XL.jpg


I still couldn't believe that I had the trail to myself. It meant no rush and I could admire the views as long as I wanted to. I passed several boulder fields, small cascades, and waterfalls along the way. The first half of the trail was pretty boring and uneventful and I usually didn't stop too many times. The scenery changed tremendously after I reached the red ledges waterfalls. This was the part of the Subway I really enjoyed the most.

subway%207%20copy-XL.jpg


subway%208%20copy-XL.jpg


waterfall%20selfie-XL.jpg


One cascade and waterfall followed the next and I stopped several times for taking pictures. It was great to be back and even though I have tons of pictures of all these spots along the trail, they all were different each time I went.

waterfall%20copy-XL.jpg


the%20crack%20copy-XL.jpg


As soon as I reached the Subway section I saw that there was a huge log in the actual Subway. Oh, I was disappointed!! How could that be!! When did that log come in here? It must have washed in during one of the summer flash floods. Well, I had to see how it looked from above. Maybe it wasn't too bad at all.

subway%209-XL.jpg


admiring%20the%20view%20copy-XL.jpg


I walked up to the Sunway section and enjoyed the view from there. And the best, no one else was there photobombing my shots. I think I never took so much time shooting the Subway in my life. I did selfies, did all angles, turned around, and shot in all directions. It was great.

selfie%202-XL.jpg


The%20Subway%20copy-XL.jpg


the%20Subway%202%20copy-XL.jpg


deep%20in%20the%20Subway%20copy-XL.jpg


canyon%20reflection%20copy-XL.jpg


I really enjoyed the time here with no one else. After about an hour, I felt I had taken enough pictures and picked a spot for a lunch break.
It was around 1 pm when I decided to hike back. The first miles went smooth and easy, and I just headed down the waterfalls to the red ledges. From there, it was more boulder hopping and negotiating around giant boulders.

swim%20hole%20copy-XL.jpg

About half a mile after the red ledges, it happened: I had my accident in the Subway. While I was sitting on a huge boulder which I was about to downclimb, my backpack got caught up in a dead branch. I couldn't move forward, so I used both my hands and tried to remove the branch entangled in my backpack's strap. Suddenly, the branch snapped and I was pushed forward, losing control and falling off the boulder. I fell only 5-6 feet but hit the ground hard with my knee.
I think I never screamed so much as I was in excruciating pain. I then began to swear profoundly. Shit, I guess I did hurt my knee really bad. I just sat on the ground for a few minutes and hoped the pain would go away. My knee was already starting to swell. I tried to get up. I still could bear a bit of weight on my knee, but I was in severe pain.
I was thinking hard. I was still almost 4 miles away from the trailhead and the only person on this hike today. I should call for SAR, or should I try to hike out myself
I was drawn back and forth. The thing is, I worked for the park, and I knew everyone in the park, including SAR and the rangers, who would respond to the call. And I was not prepared to spend a night out here, which would most likely be the case because it was already later in the day. A response from SAR would take a while. I was humiliated because it was the only time I was not prepared for my hike in the wilderness.
But I was in pain...
And everyone at work would know the next day that it was me who called it in. Decisions...
I sat there for a few minutes and still had to decide. The pain was real and the hike long. But I decided I first wanted to give it a try myself. I had Ibuprofen with me; this should help for a bit.
I slowly hobbled forward and felt I could do it.
I went slow, really slow. I couldn't bend my knee anymore because it was too swollen. But the pain was tolerable.
I was relieved when I reached the dinosaur footprints; it was only two more miles from here. I was swearing, complaining, yelling; this was unreal.
I needed a rest.
At this point, I wished there would be other hikers along the trail, other hikers who would have talked me into calling it in. Instead, I was just stupid and hobbled along the trail on my own. I think I was also too stubborn and wanted to go back on my own.
After several hours I finally reached the point where you scramble up the cliff to the rim. It felt like the biggest relief ever. The trailhead was less than a mile away. I could do it!! I cried I swear, I yelled, all at once.
The climb up with tough. I pretty much crawled up. I had to rest every minute. It was exhausting, and I was so tired. The pain was almost unbearable, but I kept going. Until this day I do not know how I managed to get up the cliff. It's beyond my imagination that I did it all on my own.
Almost up the cliff, I needed another rest. A collard lizard sat next to me.

collared%20lizard%20copy-XL.jpg


I snapped a picture, the only one I took on the hike out. The last half mile on the rim was such a relief, and I slowly hobbled forward. And finally, after a 4.5-hour crawl out, I reached my car and the trailhead. I cried when I got to my car. I finally had made it back. My knee was a mess, swollen and painful like crazy. I managed to remove my wet shoes and get into my slippahs.
That's when I took the first pictures of my knee.

big%20knee-XL.jpg


big%20knee%202-XL.jpg


I went in my car and drove to the emergency room.
I had partially torn my patella tendon and my quadriceps tendon in my accident. I also had a severe MCL sprain. I had an MRI that night and received the final diagnosis. I ended up having surgery on the patellar tendon, but the tear in my quadriceps tendon is still there as it was small enough to try to let it heal on its own. It hasn't happened yet, and I'm often still in severe pain.

IMG_8732-XL.jpg


Until this day, I can't believe I crawled and hobbled out on my own and how stupid I was not to call it in. Next time I injure myself, I will definitely use my emergency beacon. That's the whole reason to have it, right?
It took me almost a year to mostly heal from this injury, and I might still have the surgery at one point for the other tear. It was a Subway trip I will never forget in my life.
 

regehr

Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2012
Messages
1,780
yikes!!!! glad you made it out ok. a few years ago (after quite a bit of rappel practice!!) I took my kids aged 11 and 13 through the subway and this is one of many scenarios that kept me up at night in the weeks before and after that trip.

looking back I think that raps ended up not being that big a deal (they rapped off one rope and were belayed from above using a second rope) and also the water temps weren't that big of a deal (we rented drysuits for the kids, they were like little michelin men in the swims) but those slippery rocks below the technical part were actually super scary and there was a lot of potential for injury for tired folks
 

SteveR

Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2016
Messages
610
A lot of great images, but the "morning reflections" is the one that really grabbed me! It's a tough call sometimes- whether to access help, or tough it out and do it without outside assistance. In my own case I opted to hobble out after a fairly severe knee twist 12 years ago while backcountry skiing in Banff National Park. The weather was terrible which made a helicopter rescue hazardous at best for SAR, and arctic overnight lows made digging in for the night not very appealing, even though we were very well prepared for something like that. Fortunately I was not alone- I had 2 great partners including my wife, and with some splinting and support both physical and mental I was able to ski a painful 8 km out on one leg. I hope your recovery continues, mine has never completely regained it's flexibility and strength (I would say 95%).
 

Yvonne

I lava it!!!
Joined
Jan 19, 2012
Messages
3,843
yikes!!!! glad you made it out ok. a few years ago (after quite a bit of rappel practice!!) I took my kids aged 11 and 13 through the subway and this is one of many scenarios that kept me up at night in the weeks before and after that trip.

looking back I think that raps ended up not being that big a deal (they rapped off one rope and were belayed from above using a second rope) and also the water temps weren't that big of a deal (we rented drysuits for the kids, they were like little michelin men in the swims) but those slippery rocks below the technical part were actually super scary and there was a lot of potential for injury for tired folks
there are a lot of injuries in the Subway throughout the year and our SAR has a lot of operations going on there every year. Most are leg injuries. I guess, this hike and the Narrows is where most of the injuries happen. And even if you're careful, a weird situation like in my case can end up in a bad situation.

A lot of great images, but the "morning reflections" is the one that really grabbed me! It's a tough call sometimes- whether to access help, or tough it out and do it without outside assistance. In my own case I opted to hobble out after a fairly severe knee twist 12 years ago while backcountry skiing in Banff National Park. The weather was terrible which made a helicopter rescue hazardous at best for SAR, and arctic overnight lows made digging in for the night not very appealing, even though we were very well prepared for something like that. Fortunately I was not alone- I had 2 great partners including my wife, and with some splinting and support both physical and mental I was able to ski a painful 8 km out on one leg. I hope your recovery continues, mine has never completely regained it's flexibility and strength (I would say 95%).
yikes!! I cannot even imagine skiing out with a leg injury. That was a tough call deciding what to do
 

zionsky

Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2018
Messages
583
Wow! I don't know which would be harder...boulder hopping the creek on one leg back to the final climb or the 400 foot climb up to the trailhead. You did both! Adrenaline can be an amazing thing. Glad you made it back. Your picture of the lizard reminded me of the little things we see even in the most painful situations. I remember seeing this little squirrel right after my fall last year. He's just staring at me as I lay immobile in the wash. It was a nice distraction even if only for a few seconds not thinking of the pain. I'm guessing you went to St George. They have a great orthopedic team
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2020
Messages
37
Really beautiful photos and a very interesting story. You touched on an important issue: it is not black and white on when to use your emergency beacon and call SAR. Heart attack and head injuries are pretty obvious cases where to use an emergency beacon. It is not so obvious when it is an injury that is not life-threatening and you think you can make it out. I probably would have done the same.
 

IntrepidXJ

ADVENTR
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
3,463
Really beautiful photos and a very interesting story. You touched on an important issue: it is not black and white on when to use your emergency beacon and call SAR. Heart attack and head injuries are pretty obvious cases where to use an emergency beacon. It is not so obvious when it is an injury that is not life-threatening and you think you can make it out. I probably would have done the same.

I had to make a similar decision this fall when hiking up from the Esplanade. I didn't really want to call SAR, but at the time I pressed the button I was unable to make it out under my own power and really had no control over my body. However, I eventually started to feel better and was in a terrible place for a rescue so I decided to try to get out under my own power while I could ( I also had no clue if anyone had even received the message from my SPOT, so I assumed I was still on my own). I met up with SAR at the top and explained what had happened. It was definitely a scary situation that I hope never to repeat.
 

wsp_scott

Member
.
Joined
May 16, 2016
Messages
986
Beautiful photos, glad it was just your knee and not something worse
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2020
Messages
37
I had to make a similar decision this fall when hiking up from the Esplanade. I didn't really want to call SAR, but at the time I pressed the button I was unable to make it out under my own power and really had no control over my body. However, I eventually started to feel better and was in a terrible place for a rescue so I decided to try to get out under my own power while I could ( I also had no clue if anyone had even received the message from my SPOT, so I assumed I was still on my own). I met up with SAR at the top and explained what had happened. It was definitely a scary situation that I hope never to repeat.
I totally get that. Our close call was running out of water in a dry section of the Water Pocket fold after hiking 19 miles off-trail to a “reliable” water source which was dry (spring 2021). We did not have to call SAR but it was close. These are not easy decisions. BTW - I love the Esplanade and have been out there many times. I know it can be an unforgiving environment with tough access. But it rewards in big ways (as you probably know). Glad you made it out ok.
 

BeeAndElle

New Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2021
Messages
4
Those who know me also know that I love hiking the Subway Bottom-up - especially during the hot summer months. I do not mind the boulder hopping or the scramble up the lava cliff at the end of the day. The Subway is just a great trail to play in the water. When Covid hit in March 2020, the Park Service shut down Zion, including all wilderness routes. I was more than disappointed as I couldn't hike the Subway. By the end of September, as summer went by, certain wilderness routes opened up again - including the Subway. Word wasn't officially out yet when I got my permit, so I was delighted to pretty much have the entire hike to myself. It would be my 30th trip to the Subway.
I was so excited to go again that I forgot to prepare for the hike properly. A huge mistake, as I would later learn that day. I just grabbed my backpack, some food and water, and a windbreaker. That was pretty much it. No emergency blanket, no water filter, or extra food which I would usually take with me. My focus was completely on the hike and getting out there and playing. At least I remembered bringing my personal locator beacon and I had charged it the night before.
What else should go wrong? I've done the hike thirty times in the last few years and could do it blindfolded.
I had a late start around 9 am and was the only car at the trailhead. Who else can say they had the Subway trailhead all to themselves during the busy hiking season? I smiled and enjoyed it. The scramble down the 500 ft lava cliff was steep but not too bad at all. I soon reached the Left Fork of North Creek and continued pretty much most of the time in the river.
The water temperature was nice and the outside temperature pleasant. I was having a good time and made good progress.

subway%203%20copy-XL.jpg


subway%204%20copy-XL.jpg

morning reflections

Around mile two was the slab of Kayenta Sandstone with the dinosaur footprints. I always loved to stop here and admire the tracks.

subway%205-XL.jpg


I still couldn't believe that I had the trail to myself. It meant no rush and I could admire the views as long as I wanted to. I passed several boulder fields, small cascades, and waterfalls along the way. The first half of the trail was pretty boring and uneventful and I usually didn't stop too many times. The scenery changed tremendously after I reached the red ledges waterfalls. This was the part of the Subway I really enjoyed the most.

subway%207%20copy-XL.jpg


subway%208%20copy-XL.jpg


waterfall%20selfie-XL.jpg


One cascade and waterfall followed the next and I stopped several times for taking pictures. It was great to be back and even though I have tons of pictures of all these spots along the trail, they all were different each time I went.

waterfall%20copy-XL.jpg


the%20crack%20copy-XL.jpg


As soon as I reached the Subway section I saw that there was a huge log in the actual Subway. Oh, I was disappointed!! How could that be!! When did that log come in here? It must have washed in during one of the summer flash floods. Well, I had to see how it looked from above. Maybe it wasn't too bad at all.

subway%209-XL.jpg


admiring%20the%20view%20copy-XL.jpg


I walked up to the Sunway section and enjoyed the view from there. And the best, no one else was there photobombing my shots. I think I never took so much time shooting the Subway in my life. I did selfies, did all angles, turned around, and shot in all directions. It was great.

selfie%202-XL.jpg


The%20Subway%20copy-XL.jpg


the%20Subway%202%20copy-XL.jpg


deep%20in%20the%20Subway%20copy-XL.jpg


canyon%20reflection%20copy-XL.jpg


I really enjoyed the time here with no one else. After about an hour, I felt I had taken enough pictures and picked a spot for a lunch break.
It was around 1 pm when I decided to hike back. The first miles went smooth and easy, and I just headed down the waterfalls to the red ledges. From there, it was more boulder hopping and negotiating around giant boulders.

swim%20hole%20copy-XL.jpg

About half a mile after the red ledges, it happened: I had my accident in the Subway. While I was sitting on a huge boulder which I was about to downclimb, my backpack got caught up in a dead branch. I couldn't move forward, so I used both my hands and tried to remove the branch entangled in my backpack's strap. Suddenly, the branch snapped and I was pushed forward, losing control and falling off the boulder. I fell only 5-6 feet but hit the ground hard with my knee.
I think I never screamed so much as I was in excruciating pain. I then began to swear profoundly. Shit, I guess I did hurt my knee really bad. I just sat on the ground for a few minutes and hoped the pain would go away. My knee was already starting to swell. I tried to get up. I still could bear a bit of weight on my knee, but I was in severe pain.
I was thinking hard. I was still almost 4 miles away from the trailhead and the only person on this hike today. I should call for SAR, or should I try to hike out myself
I was drawn back and forth. The thing is, I worked for the park, and I knew everyone in the park, including SAR and the rangers, who would respond to the call. And I was not prepared to spend a night out here, which would most likely be the case because it was already later in the day. A response from SAR would take a while. I was humiliated because it was the only time I was not prepared for my hike in the wilderness.
But I was in pain...
And everyone at work would know the next day that it was me who called it in. Decisions...
I sat there for a few minutes and still had to decide. The pain was real and the hike long. But I decided I first wanted to give it a try myself. I had Ibuprofen with me; this should help for a bit.
I slowly hobbled forward and felt I could do it.
I went slow, really slow. I couldn't bend my knee anymore because it was too swollen. But the pain was tolerable.
I was relieved when I reached the dinosaur footprints; it was only two more miles from here. I was swearing, complaining, yelling; this was unreal.
I needed a rest.
At this point, I wished there would be other hikers along the trail, other hikers who would have talked me into calling it in. Instead, I was just stupid and hobbled along the trail on my own. I think I was also too stubborn and wanted to go back on my own.
After several hours I finally reached the point where you scramble up the cliff to the rim. It felt like the biggest relief ever. The trailhead was less than a mile away. I could do it!! I cried I swear, I yelled, all at once.
The climb up with tough. I pretty much crawled up. I had to rest every minute. It was exhausting, and I was so tired. The pain was almost unbearable, but I kept going. Until this day I do not know how I managed to get up the cliff. It's beyond my imagination that I did it all on my own.
Almost up the cliff, I needed another rest. A collard lizard sat next to me.

collared%20lizard%20copy-XL.jpg


I snapped a picture, the only one I took on the hike out. The last half mile on the rim was such a relief, and I slowly hobbled forward. And finally, after a 4.5-hour crawl out, I reached my car and the trailhead. I cried when I got to my car. I finally had made it back. My knee was a mess, swollen and painful like crazy. I managed to remove my wet shoes and get into my slippahs.
That's when I took the first pictures of my knee.

big%20knee-XL.jpg


big%20knee%202-XL.jpg


I went in my car and drove to the emergency room.
I had partially torn my patella tendon and my quadriceps tendon in my accident. I also had a severe MCL sprain. I had an MRI that night and received the final diagnosis. I ended up having surgery on the patellar tendon, but the tear in my quadriceps tendon is still there as it was small enough to try to let it heal on its own. It hasn't happened yet, and I'm often still in severe pain.

IMG_8732-XL.jpg


Until this day, I can't believe I crawled and hobbled out on my own and how stupid I was not to call it in. Next time I injure myself, I will definitely use my emergency beacon. That's the whole reason to have it, right?
It took me almost a year to mostly heal from this injury, and I might still have the surgery at one point for the other tear. It was a Subway trip I will never forget in my life.
Wow! What a soldier you are! I would have done the same or at least wanted to do the same. I would be embarrassed to call for help, which is just being stubborn. I'm so glad you made it out and have such beautiful pictures! The day was destined, it seems. I hope you have a full recovery and enjoy the subway another day.
 

Yvonne

I lava it!!!
Joined
Jan 19, 2012
Messages
3,843
Wow! I don't know which would be harder...boulder hopping the creek on one leg back to the final climb or the 400 foot climb up to the trailhead. You did both! Adrenaline can be an amazing thing. Glad you made it back. Your picture of the lizard reminded me of the little things we see even in the most painful situations. I remember seeing this little squirrel right after my fall last year. He's just staring at me as I lay immobile in the wash. It was a nice distraction even if only for a few seconds not thinking of the pain. I'm guessing you went to St George. They have a great orthopedic team
I don't know, both were tough. Until this day I don't know how I went up that cliff.
And yeah, I went to St. George for treatment. The Instacare in Hurricane was already closed so I had to do the long drive. Glad I did, it was speeding up treatment right away which was crucial. I was so swollen they feared I would get Compartment Syndrome which would have really sucked.

Really beautiful photos and a very interesting story. You touched on an important issue: it is not black and white on when to use your emergency beacon and call SAR. Heart attack and head injuries are pretty obvious cases where to use an emergency beacon. It is not so obvious when it is an injury that is not life-threatening and you think you can make it out. I probably would have done the same.
I felt I had no right to call SAR. I only had a severe leg injury but was not dying like someone else could have because SAR was heading out to me. I felt that the justification to call it in was not given in my case so I simply roughed it out. Others would easily have called SAR for even minor injuries and they do very often. We often get calls for the weirdest things.
I'm glad it worked out in my case. I was really humiliated not having the ten essentials with me that day so my decision to hobble out was easily made.
 
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