Sleeping bag liners.

Pianomover

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May 25, 2019
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I have no experience with them. I’m looking to extend the use of my 20 degree bag and am wondering if any of you have used them and gotten the added temp that they claim to provide. Thanks.
 

Bob

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Get the silk cocoon one. Works really well
 

Wanderlust073

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I have one and it warms you up some, but it's never made the difference (for me) between being too cold and just right. It just kicks you up to slightly less too cold...

Thermal underwear, puffy coat, hat and gloves - now you're toasty. Thicker sleeping pad can help too if you aren't already using an all season pad.
 

Perry

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Never tried a liner but on my recent trip to the Uintas I brought along a cheap down throw to put over my bag and was very comfortable. At 14.75 ounces it is probably heavier than a liner but for $19.95 at Bed Bath and Beyond it’s a bargain.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Brendan S

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Mar 19, 2016
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A liner is a really poor way to add insulation and adds very little CLO. Wearing the clothes/puffy you are already carrying should be part of your sleep system. As mentioned above, synthetic quilt or throw is also an excellent addition. If you are using a down bag or quilt as your main insulation, a synthetic overquilt will move the dew point out into the synthetic insulation rather than the down, preventing condensation in your down.

The one positive that a liner brings is, over time, preventing oils from causing loss of loft in your down if you are sleeping in your trail clothes. Occasionally washing your bag takes care of this anyway.

If you want to get into some real nitty gritty, start diving into some of Richard Nisley’s threads and writings over on backpackinglight (the “new paradigm...” threads are all worth a read). Lots of textile and insulation testing, analysis, and charts for recommended insulation values for different levels of metabolic activity (including sleep).
 
Last edited:

Jackson

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I've used a cheap Coleman fleece liner in my 15 degree bag a handful of times and I was almost fully comfortable near 0 degrees with it. Only complaint is the space the fleece takes up in my backpack. I'll be using it more now that the temps are dropping though.
 

Born to Hike

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Jan 14, 2017
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I bought a Sea to Summit Thermolite a few years ago with high hopes of making a difference from not getting cold at night using an under performing sleeping bag: it helped but did not save the day and I still froze my butt off till I invested in a better down bag, and as the above comments have stated, the best way is to layer up with your clothing to keep you warm. Those liners are GREAT though at keeping your bag clean especially after days on the trail - much easier to wash than your bag.
Another thought: I take hand warmers for my dogs (I have the dogs pack them) to help them stay warm at night and have found they do wonders for me if I am on the cold side: I have put one on each leg under my thermals over/close to the femoral arteries to warm the body up - works very well too - just extra weight though if you are carrying it all. :)
 

Brendan S

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Mar 19, 2016
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I've used a cheap Coleman fleece liner in my 15 degree bag a handful of times and I was almost fully comfortable near 0 degrees with it. Only complaint is the space the fleece takes up in my backpack. I'll be using it more now that the temps are dropping though.
Why not roll with a fleece top and pants? Same insulation value, lighter, more compact, and more versatile. 100 wt fleece is cheap and great for hiking in wet conditions in shoulder seasons.

My real suggestion is to pick up a sewing machine at a thrift store and turn that liner into some pants and a fleece vest. Total four pieces and like 5 seams. Then you’ll have the bug and pick up some shell material and 2.5 oz climashield apex for your piece-o-cake topquilt/summer bag. :cool:
 

Brendan S

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Another thought: I take hand warmers for my dogs (I have the dogs pack them) to help them stay warm at night and have found they do wonders for me if I am on the cold side: I have put one on each leg under my thermals over/close to the femoral arteries to warm the body up - works very well too - just extra weight though if you are carrying it all. :)
Some hot water in a HDPE Nalgene works great here too. Also helps to force moisture out of your bag. It’s stuff you’re already carrying and agreed makes a significant difference in the winter.
 

Bob

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Liners do work, at least the silk ones do...silk does insulate and is lightweight. I say this from using it... I'd guess it adds 5 to 10 degrees for me, very noticeable, but I don't sleep cold. Plus it keeps body oils out if the bag which is a plus. Wife says it helps a lot for her as well and she sleeps cold. My 2 cents.

Clothing layers work ... But I don't want to wear my sweaty, moist and or dirty clothes at night.... Always sleep better with clean stuff.. best to have a dedicated sleeping set up. But each there own... I use what is tried and tried for me over the 50 years of backpacking
 

Bob

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Some hot water in a HDPE Nalgene works great here too. Also helps to force moisture out of your bag. It’s stuff you’re already carrying and agreed makes a significant difference in the winter.
Great if you have good water and/or extra fuel....
 

Pianomover

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May 25, 2019
Messages
152
I bought a Sea to Summit Thermolite a few years ago with high hopes of making a difference from not getting cold at night using an under performing sleeping bag: it helped but did not save the day and I still froze my butt off till I invested in a better down bag, and as the above comments have stated, the best way is to layer up with your clothing to keep you warm. Those liners are GREAT though at keeping your bag clean especially after days on the trail - much easier to wash than your bag.
Another thought: I take hand warmers for my dogs (I have the dogs pack them) to help them stay warm at night and have found they do wonders for me if I am on the cold side: I have put one on each leg under my thermals over/close to the femoral arteries to warm the body up - works very well too - just extra weight though if you are carrying it all. :)
This is exactly what I was hoping I’d get from a liner the clean factor plus the extra few degrees.
 

Pianomover

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May 25, 2019
Messages
152
Never tried a liner but on my recent trip to the Uintas I brought along a cheap down throw to put over my bag and was very comfortable. At 14.75 ounces it is probably heavier than a liner but for $19.95 at Bed Bath and Beyond it’s a bargain.




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I already carry a similar down throw that Costco carries but that’s for the dog.
 

Brendan S

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Mar 19, 2016
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This is exactly what I was hoping I’d get from a liner the clean factor plus the extra few degrees.
If it’s cold enough to need a liner I guess I don’t see how the clean factor really is a factor. You are going to be sleeping in some extra clothes so it’s not like your sweaty baselayer is in direct contact with your bag. An extra set of baselayer top and bottoms is lighter and would be more comfortable and versatile anyway vs a liner.

Regarding warmth, insulation is an actual measurable thing and a liner doesn’t provide much. Anecdotes about “feeling warmer” only mean so much. If you really want more insulation, a light synthetic top bag provides significantly more warmth and works great in its own as a summer bag. I have a couple 2.5 oz climashield Apex quilts with silk or taffeta shells that cost about $50 in materials from ripstopbytheroll and take about an hour to sew, even for a newbie. Weigh about 12-14 oz. if you don’t want to DIY, places like enlightened equipment can hook you up.

Some CLO values per oz (this is old...newer synthetics are even better)
Cotton 0.04
Merino wool 0.08
Polartec 100,200, 300 0.16
Polarguard 3D 0.63
Exceloft 0.68
Polarguard Delta 0.68
Climashield HL 0.68
Down (550 fill) 0.7
Primaloft Sport 0.74
Climashield Combat 0.79
Climashield XP 0.82
Primaloft One 0.84
Down (850+ fill) 2.53
 

wsp_scott

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May 16, 2016
Messages
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Never used a liner, but I'll second the recommendation for a warm sleep pad if you don't have one. I recently upgraded to a XTherm and was shocked at how warm I slept on my trip to SEKI. Nothing changed from last year's trip except for the pad and this year was slightly colder (ice crystals in water one morning) and the difference in comfort was noticeable.

My sleep clothes are Patagonia Capilene 4 (basically long underwear) and I have a 30 degree quilt from Underground Equipment and a cheap heavy weight fleece hat. If I need extra warmth, I sleep in my puffy. This is good to around 10 degrees if cowboy camping and probably lower if I was in a tent.

Old pad: Klymit Insulated Short from Massdrop - R-value = 4
New Pad: Thermarest XTherm - R-value = 5.7
 

Jackson

I like to go outside.
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Joined
May 31, 2015
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Why not roll with a fleece top and pants? Same insulation value, lighter, more compact, and more versatile. 100 wt fleece is cheap and great for hiking in wet conditions in shoulder seasons.

My real suggestion is to pick up a sewing machine at a thrift store and turn that liner into some pants and a fleece vest. Total four pieces and like 5 seams. Then you’ll have the bug and pick up some shell material and 2.5 oz climashield apex for your piece-o-cake topquilt/summer bag. :cool:
That's a great idea. I already have the sewing machine and plenty of thread. I just lack any practice with it. Haha. It's not exactly a fashion show in the tent though so I guess it doesn't matter if I do a poor job making my own clothing.
We do use the liner for the dog when camping sometimes too. We could just buy her something more compact and filled with down though.
 

Brendan S

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Mar 19, 2016
Messages
382
I use these as well, and have the top too. Lightweight and very warm. Wear them skiing as well and they are holding up well after a few years.
Another +1 for Cap 4 (now called Thermal Weight). The hooded pullover is probably the most versatile clothing piece I’ve ever owned. Extremely breathable on its own for high output activities and throw a windshirt (or sleeping bag) over it and adds a surprising amount of warmth.
 

Bob

Trailmaster
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Mar 3, 2013
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Lol ... All the suggestions work fine.... But you also need to consider the packing size bulk and the weight. Of course it boils down to how much more warm you are trying to get.... Which the best way may be a different bag for colder times...
I save sleeping in my clothes I've worn hiking as very last resort
 
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