Macro Photography

pixie1339

Desperately Seeking Sandstone
Joined
Jan 21, 2012
Messages
1,692
When summer rolls around there's nothing I love more than taking pictures of the pretty wildflowers along the trails, but I'm not terribly satisfied with the quality of shots that I'm getting. Since we have some very talented photographers in this group, I'm hoping to get some tips for better macro photography, short of buying a macro lens. I'd love to own one eventually, but just can't afford it right now. What about macro filters? Are they helpful or can you acheive results that are just as good without them?
 

Bill

.
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
991
Save your money and get some real glass. I have two friends that got good deals on used Canon 100mm F2.8's w/ tubes off KSL.
 

IntrepidXJ

ADVENTR
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
3,349
Do you have a P&S with macro mode? My suggestion would be to use that until you save up for a macro lens. Don't bother wasting money on a temporary solution and use that money to start saving up for the lens.
 

pixie1339

Desperately Seeking Sandstone
Joined
Jan 21, 2012
Messages
1,692
Do you have a P&S with macro mode? My suggestion would be to use that until you save up for a macro lens. Don't bother wasting money on a temporary solution and use that money to start saving up for the lens.

Not anymore. The lens on my point and shoot got geyser spray on it from Yellowstone and developed spots that wouldn't come out, which is when I upgraded to my Canon. I really want to get another point and shoot. It would be nice to have for the convenience factor. I'm surprised that I can't get better shots with my Canon, though. My last P&S took pictures that were at least as good, maybe better, than anything I've taken with my Canon. Maybe I should save for a point and shoot instead of a macro lens. Lol!
 

Nick

-
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Joined
Aug 9, 2007
Messages
12,918
Not anymore. The lens on my point and shoot got geyser spray on it from Yellowstone and developed spots that wouldn't come out, which is when I upgraded to my Canon. I really want to get another point and shoot. It would be nice to have for the convenience factor. I'm surprised that I can't get better shots with my Canon, though. My last P&S took pictures that were at least as good, maybe better, than anything I've taken with my Canon. Maybe I should save for a point and shoot instead of a macro lens. Lol!

Did you try vinegar on that lens? Or something that gets rid of mineral deposits like lime descaler? I can't imagine it's anything other than really mineral-rich water.
 

Yvonne

I lava it!!!
Joined
Jan 19, 2012
Messages
3,632
I only use my S95 point and shoot for macro shots and for the most part they are absolutely okay.
I once thought about a macro lens, but I wouldn't use it too much and so I stayed with my point and shoot and cannot complain.
 

Dave

Broadcaster, formerly "ashergrey"
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Joined
May 5, 2012
Messages
1,722
Save your money and get some real glass. I have two friends that got good deals on used Canon 100mm F2.8's w/ tubes off KSL.

Or even rent the 100mm L from Pictureline for a trip to try it out. It's on my short list of lenses to buy after doing that.
 

gnwatts

Member
.
Joined
May 19, 2012
Messages
1,825
I bought a 35-70mm Zeiss Vario-sonnar, which has a macro selection. It is a manual lens, but with the right adapter ring (required) you can have focus confirm.
It is a beautiful piece of glass, that can be had for about $350. Stunning optics.
 

pixie1339

Desperately Seeking Sandstone
Joined
Jan 21, 2012
Messages
1,692
I bought a 35-70mm Zeiss Vario-sonnar, which has a macro selection. It is a manual lens, but with the right adapter ring (required) you can have focus confirm.
It is a beautiful piece of glass, that can be had for about $350. Stunning optics.

I'll bet it's quite good. The Zeiss lenses generally are. Sigh...stupid budget.
 

Deadeye008

Hambone
Joined
Jan 18, 2012
Messages
742
Those look pretty cool! Still more money than I can spend right now, but certainly within closer reach than a true macro lens. Thank you!

I just looked at the current price of Kenko tubes and they have gone up a ton since I bought mine a few years ago. I bought mine new for under $100. I still stand by them. They produce great images when combined with both my 28mm and 85 mm primes. I rarely shoot macro so for me they were a good investment. If you are going to shoot a lot of macro a dedicated macro lens would be better. I'll see if I can round up some shots I have taken with them and post them here.
 

pixie1339

Desperately Seeking Sandstone
Joined
Jan 21, 2012
Messages
1,692
I just looked at the current price of Kenko tubes and they have gone up a ton since I bought mine a few years ago. I bought mine new for under $100. I still stand by them. They produce great images when combined with both my 28mm and 85 mm primes. I rarely shoot macro so for me they were a good investment. If you are going to shoot a lot of macro a dedicated macro lens would be better. I'll see if I can round up some shots I have taken with them and post them here.

That would be great to see some shots you've taken using them. Thanks!
 

neiloro

Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2012
Messages
104
You can buy adapters that let you mount your lens on backwards. Turns any lens into a macro, but you lose all focus and aperture control. Just moved closer, farther for focus. New lenses may be wide open. Do that in conjunction with an old cheapie lens you could pick up at a thrift store, and you'll be good.
Mineral deposits should come off the just normal water. Think of it as salt you need to dissolve. Try deionized water that one uses in car batteries, which has all minerals removed, which can absorb more salts.
 

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