3 Nights at Havasu Falls Part 2

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Carcass

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Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
194
From Supai Village to the campground is two miles, and most of it is easy walking on a dirt road. I would guess there is a total of 400 foot elevation drop between Supai and the campground. Me and my new friends walked through the town and made our way, stopping for pictures of the creek when it came into view.

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There was one bridge crossing we all took time to appreciate the scenery around us.

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Again, it was an easy walk on a dirt road, and then to the left, we see the first set of falls: 50 Foot Falls and Navajo Falls. It was a beautiful sight to see and hear.

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After this, we knew we were getting close to Havasu Falls and before we knew it, we were there. My pictures can't do it justice, but it is truly something to see.

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The trail runs to the left(looking downcanyon) of the falls, providing a good view while descending to the bottom We missed the sun being directly on the falls, but it was still something to behold. The color of the water is simply stunning. And yes, there were 4 people at the bottom swimming in the splash pool. As long as they stayed in the water, they were fine. When they got out, it was cold. Probably in the 40's at this time. The travertine was something from Dr. Suess. Once at the bottom, I made my way to get closer looks from the bottom.

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After soaking on the views, and the spray, it was time to head down the trail about 200 yards to the beginning of the camping section. The camping area stretches about a mile long along the creek, and camping is allowed pretty much anywhere you want. There are toilets scattered throughout the camping section, but the one nearest Havasu Falls was the largest, as most people seem to camp in this area. There were islands in the stream that you could get to by either wading through the creek or taking some homemade bridge across. In the summer, this place will be filled with tents and such, so if you want solitude, this won't be the place to go to. No campfires allowed either. The area was fairly clean and in the spring-fall, the greenery would make the scene even better. The campsites had decent ground to pitch a tent on and plenty of trees to hang a hammock from, which I saw very few of at this time of the year.

Got set up and ready to make dinner: burritos.

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Decided to set up on a high bank instead of right along the river because rain was supposed to come in on Wednesday.

Had some leftover meat for my little buddy to chow down on.

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All in all, it was about 10 miles to the campsite, with relatively easy walking. I didn't see another hiker until a mile from Supai, and three mule trains passed by making their way up to get their loads to bring stuff down. Things get down to Supai by mule or helicopter. All the mail goes out in and out on mules. Surprisingly, my shoulders felt fine but my feet were hurting. My pack was about 45 pounds and I guess I got it packed correctly and positioned correctly because I didn't really feel it much at all. No blisters, hot spots, or raw rubbing areas.
 

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Titans

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Aug 18, 2018
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Beautiful place! It's really great you got to hike most of it without the crowds. How many people were at the campground in the evening do you think?
How did you do with the cool mist from the falls, did you stay warm enough at the campground? Cool damp air tends to cut through the bones so to speak. I saw the rainy forecast earlier this week, curious to read Part 3! Thanks for sharing @Carcass .

The (spring fed) water is suppose to be 70F year round, so since @Jammer took a bath once in Wahweap creek, I'm guessing he might take a dip at Havasu Falls in a few weeks from now :)
 

Carcass

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Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
194
Beautiful place! It's really great you got to hike most of it without the crowds. How many people were at the campground in the evening do you think?
How did you do with the cool mist from the falls, did you stay warm enough at the campground? Cool damp air tends to cut through the bones so to speak. I saw the rainy forecast earlier this week, curious to read Part 3! Thanks for sharing @Carcass .

The (spring fed) water is suppose to be 70F year round, so since @Jammer took a bath once in Wahweap creek, I'm guessing he might take a dip at Havasu Falls in a few weeks from now :)
I would say less than 100 people. Sevetal left after only a day because they said it was too cold. Thry should have added that they didn't bring the proper clothing and sleeping bag. One family from Wisconsin left early because they thought Arizona was a desert and would be warm. They supposedly hiked out the day I did even after I told them to stay put or they would be hiking out in the rain and they didn't have the right gear. The first night I got cold, but i didn't have a sleeping pad. I coukd feel the difference I had a 20 degree rated bag, but the side of me on the ground got cold. They next night, I put a light jacket and a couple of shirts under the bag and slept in my heavier jacket and was fine. The last night I just wore the light jacket. During the day I never felt cold. The hike back out was steady rain.

As for the mist, it didn't feel cold, but I didn't stay in it long. To me the water upstream from the first set of falls was warmer than below Havasu Falls. On the way to Beaver Falls, I had to cross the creek three times. Each time I didn't think it was that cold even when I got out of the water. I never felt chilled. The people that swam, when they got out of the water they were shivering when exposed to the 50 degree air temps. If I had a towel, I probably would have jumped in just to say I swam.
 

Jammer

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Messages
626
Yes -- thanks for sharing @Carcass. It def gets me more excited about my upcoming trip and it's good to know what to expect so early in the season (or just in general as it's actually my first trip there.)

And Yes, @Titans -- if there is at least a ray of sunshine, I will get in that water! :twothumbs:
 

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