Uintas

Hikes in Utah's Uinta Mountains including the High Uintas Wilderness

High Uintas Backpacking

The Uinta Mountains are located in northeastern Utah along the Wyoming and Colorado borders. The Uinta Range is unique in that it is the only major mountain range in the contiguous United States that runs east to west. It is also amongst the wettest places in Utah, receiving more than 40 inches of precipitation each year.

The High Uintas Wilderness, established in 1984, occupies the core of the Uinta range, extending from just east of the Mirror Lake area all the way to the Spirit and Chepeta Lake areas on the east end of the range.

The Uintas are a very popular destination for hiking and backpacking with the most popular areas seeing significant traffic during the summer months. The typical season in the High Uintas ranges from mid-June to October, with many of the passes and peaks limited to travel from around mid-July to mid-September, depending on recent conditions.

The Uintas are especially well suited for backpacking loop hikes thanks to the multitude of trailheads and passes to connect the various basins. The best camping and hiking in the High Uintas is typically found between 10,000-11,000 feet with passes in excess of 12,000 feet. Peaks in the Uintas range from 11,000 all the way up to 13,528 feet at the top of King's Peak, the highest point in Utah.

  1. Four Lakes Basin

    At first glance, the 9-mile hike to Four Lakes Basin doesn’t...
    4/5, 1 vote
    Views:
    3,005
    Updated:
    Feb 8, 2014
  2. Ruth Lake

    Ruth Lake is a great introductory trail for anyone interested...
    4/5, 5 votes
    Views:
    3,108
    Updated:
    Jan 25, 2014
  3. Bald Mountain

    At 11,943’ above sea level, Bald Mountain is the highest...
    4/5, 3 votes
    Views:
    2,487
    Updated:
    Jan 25, 2014
  4. Amethyst Basin

    With a handful of high alpine lakes surrounded by majestic,...
    4.9/5, 7 votes
    Views:
    5,590
    Updated:
    Jan 24, 2014
  5. Duck Lake

    If you're looking for a nice day hike or an easy overnighter...
    3.8/5, 6 votes
    Views:
    6,944
    Updated:
    Mar 10, 2013
  6. Potter Lake

    Potter Lake is forest-lined aquatic gem high up in the...
    3.5/5, 2 votes
    Views:
    3,365
    Updated:
    Mar 10, 2013
  7. Jean and Dean Lakes

    Jean and Dean Lakes are a popular backpacking destination in...
    3.5/5, 2 votes
    Views:
    7,167
    Updated:
    Jan 27, 2013
  8. Scudder Lake

    Scudder Lake is a pleasant destination easily accessed via...
    3/5, 4 votes
    Views:
    4,098
    Updated:
    Jan 27, 2013
  9. Kabell Lake

    Kabell Lake is a relatively flat, easy trail that can be a...
    3/5, 1 vote
    Views:
    3,038
    Updated:
    Jan 26, 2013
  10. Allsop Lake

    Unlike most other lakes in the Uintas, Allsop Lake sits alone...
    4.8/5, 4 votes
    Views:
    9,907
    Updated:
    Nov 14, 2013
  11. Ryder Lake

    The headwaters of Stillwater Fork begin their long,...
    5/5, 5 votes
    Views:
    8,986
    Updated:
    Jan 24, 2013
  12. Kermsuh Lake

    Kermsuh Lake, pronounced 'kerm-sue', is one of the least...
    3.8/5, 4 votes
    Views:
    6,238
    Updated:
    Jan 21, 2013
  13. Garfield Basin

    The trailhead for this trail starts relatively high, so...
    3/5, 1 vote
    Views:
    3,380
    Updated:
    Jan 24, 2013
  14. Island Lake, McCoy Park

    With seemingly endless meadows, an easily accessible...
    4/5, 1 vote
    Views:
    3,278
    Updated:
    Dec 29, 2012
  15. Milk Lake

    Milk Lake is one of those places you see on a map and wonder...
    4/5, 3 votes
    Views:
    3,863
    Updated:
    Jan 14, 2013
  16. Ibantik Lake

    Ibantik Lake is probably one of the best Uintas wilderness...
    4.2/5, 5 votes
    Views:
    14,851
    Updated:
    Mar 10, 2013
  17. Island Lake

    At just over 7 miles round trip, Island Lake makes for an...
    4/5, 4 votes
    Views:
    12,178
    Updated:
    Jan 13, 2013
  18. Priord Lake

    Priord Lake sits at the top of the Right Hand Fork of the...
    4.6/5, 5 votes
    Views:
    5,381
    Updated:
    Apr 8, 2013
The information provided here is intended for entertainment purposes only. The creator of this information and/or Backcountry Post are not liable for any harm or damage caused by this information. Conditions in the backcountry are constantly changing, only you are responsible for your safety and well being when traveling outdoors. Carry emergency supplies and always tell someone where you are going. The content of this page may not be duplicated without the express written permission of Backcountry Post and/or the individual copyright owner.
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