Ribzz Front Back

Discussion in 'Gear' started by DrNed, Jan 31, 2018.

  1. DrNed

    DrNed The mountains are calling and I must go

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Utah
    Wondering if anyone wears a front pack with their
    backpack and what your experience has been.

    Watched this video today and I'm seriously considering.

     
  2. Nick

    Nick Post 'em if you got 'em!

    Messages:
    11,964
    Location:
    Utah
    If you ever backpack to climber-centric destinations like the Cirque of the Towers, you'll probably see people getting way crazier with front packs. I've seen guys with full size huge backpacks on front and back to accommodate their climbing gear on that trail.

    I personally don't want more stuff on the front of me (the camera is plenty). Another issue is downward visibility when you're dancing through rocks. But I can see the logic in wanting access to a few things without stopping.
     
  3. Wanderlust073

    Wanderlust073 Member

    Messages:
    355
    Location:
    Colorado
    They're ok. I have one and have used it before. I have two main gripes about them

    - the straps, once tangled (which happens the instant you remove the thing), are rage-inducing to straighten out

    - they are hot. You will be amazed at the amount of sweat that area of your torso can produce if you are traveling anywhere warm/humid.
     
  4. DrNed

    DrNed The mountains are calling and I must go

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Utah
    Thanks for the input. That is the kinda
    real world experience I was looking for.
     
  5. WasatchWill

    WasatchWill Ready For More

    Messages:
    1,136
    Location:
    Provo, UT
    The guy in that video is a member of the forum. It's @Devin Ashby. I know he likes his Ribz pack for the quick access it offers him for some specific items, but it doesn't hurt to throw a mention his way to see if he's found any more cons to it since he made the video.
     
  6. DrNed

    DrNed The mountains are calling and I must go

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Utah
    I know at one point you had some kind of personal set up
    where you were able to attach a water bottle to your sternum strap.
    How did you do that?

    I do want some easy access to a few things, which is why
    I was looking at the Ribzz pack, but even more, I'm looking
    for some way to have easy access to my water bottle. I gave up
    using bladders and haven't found a set up yet that I like for
    a water bottle.

    Thanks!
     
  7. Perry

    Perry Formerly Cuberant

    Messages:
    887
    Location:
    Morgan, UT
    @DrNed If you’re looking for something simple for water bottles these might be of interest...

    [​IMG]

    I think I bought them at Sportsman’s Warehouse for not very much $$.

    They are elastic so they’ll even take the big Nalgenes...

    [​IMG]

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2018
    DrNed, WasatchWill and Jackson like this.
  8. DrNed

    DrNed The mountains are calling and I must go

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Utah
    Perfect!

    Do they work well? Where do you clip them to your pack?
    I'm guessing you get a fair amount of bouncing?
     
  9. Perry

    Perry Formerly Cuberant

    Messages:
    887
    Location:
    Morgan, UT
    The worked well but they do bounce around a bit. I just clipped them on my pack straps where there is a little cross strap. I've not been using them so much lately as I have camera gear and my InReach up front these days so there just isn't room.
     
  10. WasatchWill

    WasatchWill Ready For More

    Messages:
    1,136
    Location:
    Provo, UT
    Years ago now, I saw something comparable to these for sale in the camping section in Walmart (they don't carry them anymore) but there's some YT vids that show how to make them like this one. I simply hooked the biner up onto my load lifter strap above my shoulder. You can also rig a DIY one up with lighter weight dyneema cord, or any other basic nylon cord, using a small biner and cord lock. To secure the bottom from bouncing around and dangling, I'll take a loop of shock cord with a cord lock on it and thread it through my shoulder pad and the strap that runs down the front of it, and then secure that loop around the bottom of the bottle. May not need to be shock cord for the bottom, but I think it helps take some stress off the cord-lock itself and helps to keep it from sliding loose. If anything, it just makes it so you can quickly stretch the loops on and off the bottom of the bottle without constantly engaging the cord lock.

    upload_2018-2-3_17-39-43.png

    WB03.jpg

    Here's a video that demo's a real simple DIY setup comparable to mine:

    And here's one that just employs a single loop on the shoulder strap and the center of the bottle without anything holding the neck of the bottle:

    Honestly, there's quite a few vids on YT with people showing off comparable setups.

    And if you want more options/possibilities, both commercial and DIY:

    http://aquaclip.com/

    https://www.99boulders.com/how-to-attach-a-water-bottle-to-a-backpack-strap

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Paracord-Water-Jug-Harness/
     
    Perry likes this.
  11. DrNed

    DrNed The mountains are calling and I must go

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Utah
    Wow!
    Thanks Will.
     
  12. WasatchWill

    WasatchWill Ready For More

    Messages:
    1,136
    Location:
    Provo, UT
    No prob. You're welcome!
     
  13. Perry

    Perry Formerly Cuberant

    Messages:
    887
    Location:
    Morgan, UT
    @DrNed I happened by Sportsmans Warehouse the other day. They still have the bottle holders and pretty cheap I might add...

    IMG_3047.jpg
     
  14. DrNed

    DrNed The mountains are calling and I must go

    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Utah
    I'll check it out, thanks!
     
  15. Devin Ashby

    Devin Ashby Don't Bust The Crust!

    Messages:
    59
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    I am late to the game here, haven't logged into this forum for a bit. But to give my 2 cents in addition to my video you linked. The biggest con of the ribz pack for me is how freaking hot it is. I sweat pretty bad with it and it makes it pretty uncomfortable in the summer. It however is very convenient and holds a lot of gear. Since I am filming my trips and hikes I like to have it for access to all that gear. But many times I feel that I can get away with not taking it and having a dry bag at the top of my pack with all that same gear.
     
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